Things changed here in April 2019. TGTF will be further evolving in 2020. Stay tuned!

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Chain of Flowers / April and May 2017 English Tour

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 9:00 am
 

Following their second visit to America and appearances at SXSW 2017 in mid-March, Cardiff post-punks Chain of Flowers are set to tour England in late April. Being the good Welsh ambassador that he is, the legend that is Huw Stephens interviewed several of the Welsh acts in Austin during the week of SXSW including Chain of Flowers.You can listen to the broadcast for the next 2 weeks on Radio Wales through here. During his chat with frontman Josh Smith on Thursday at the British Music Embassy, they discuss the slight incongruity that this tour only includes English dates. No matter; I reckon they’ll be back playing shows on American shores soon enough. Tickets to the following shows are on sale now. My review of their Thursday afternoon show can be read here; Carrie also caught them at the Music for Listeners afternon showcase at El Sapo, so her review of that is forthcoming. For more on Chain of Flowers on TGTF, follow this link.

Monday 24th April 2017 – Leeds Brudenell Social Club
Tuesday 25th April 2017 – Manchester Castle
Wednesday 26th April 2017 – Birmingham Hare and Hounds 2
Friday 28th April 2017 – Bristol Louisiana
Saturday 29th April 2017 – Southampton Joiners
Sunday 30th April 2017 – Brighton Hope and Ruin
Monday 1st May 2017 – London Camden Lock Tavern (free show)

 

Live Gig Video: Courtney Barnett and band perform ‘Nobody Really Cares If You Don’t Go to the Party’ outside Camden Town tube station

 
By on Tuesday, 25th August 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

Last week, Courtney Barnett and her live band stormed the area outside Camden Town tube station in north London to do a guerrilla gig and filming. So what was it all for? To produce enough footage for the live promo for ‘Nobody Really Cares If You Don’t Go to the Party’, of course. As you might imagine, with Barnett being such a big indie star now, the noise and hubbub of them setting up grew a big crowd for the actual performance. Watch the raucous impromptu performance below.

‘Nobody Really Cares If You Don’t Go to the Party’ will be released on the 11th of September on House Anxiety / Marathon Artists. For everything Courtney Barnett on TGTF, go here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZOGlFdReMM[/youtube]

 

Live Gig Video: Gnarwolves take over Camden Lock with ‘Smoking Kills’ for Dr. Martens’ #STANDFORSOMETHING

 
By on Wednesday, 25th February 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

Header photo by Emma Swann

Let’s say you’re just minding you own business down Camden Lock, wanting to do a bit of shopping or get a piercing. All of a sudden, your relative tranquility is shaken by an impromptu gig put on by a rock band. Well, that’s exactly what happened on Saturday, when Gnarwolves floated down the canal in a barge, surprising fans and curious onlookers with a five-song set. Says the band of their guerrilla gig:

WE STAND FOR SCRAPING BY. SKATE OR DIE. Playing on a barge was awesome, surreal in fact! We’ve played in some weird countries, small, tight, little venues, cafés and shops but we’ve never played on a boat, outside, in the freezing cold to hundreds of kids in Camden. We’ve played in three or four venues in and around Camden before but this was a whole new experience. This is one of the best gigs we’ve ever done. It was great to show everyone some real punk songs and that the punk scene is alive and kicking.

The surprise show was sponsored by the Dr. Martens brand, long synonymous with Camden, and their ongoing #STANDFORSOMETHING tour. Watch the mayhem – well, controlled mayhem, you know what I mean – below.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iW9oCHSTZQc[/youtube]

 

Preview: Camden Rocks Festival 2014

 
By on Friday, 11th April 2014 at 3:00 pm
 

Camden Rocks is one of a new breed of urbane festival that has infiltrated the scene across the U.S. and Europe. It requires the special kind of electric setting that can be found in places like Camden and Dublin, or organically grown ala SXSW; the corner of Texas that grew into national new music mecca. On 31 May, 20 venues across the borough will fire up their PAs, and over 200 bands will take to the stage from midday through to the small hours. There’s no mud, no tents and no burst fibreglass urinals. But what it lacks in escapist appeal, it will surely make up for in cultural backdrop and convenience. The Subways are what you might call the conventional headliners, but you can almost guarantee that it will be one of the plethora of lesser known talent that will steal the headlines.

Camden Rocks was conceived as homage to the borough’s staggering influence over the British music scene for the past 50 years. For so long an incubator of fragile new talent – from psychedelia to punk to Britpop – festival promoters have sought to express this diversity with an eclectic line up set across 20 of the town’s famous aural boltholes. It began as a one off, headlined by Pete Doherty and Carl Barat in 2009, and boasted a distinctly London chic, even if its scope was embryonic by comparison.

Resurfacing again in 2013, this year’s line-up is now a leviathan with hundreds of slobbering, stage-hardened heads just waiting to gnaw your face off. Some, like electronic punk rockers Sonic Boom Six, will be returning for another bite after appearing at the festival’s inception, whilst the likes of young guns The Hell will be attempting to muscle in and gain their share of the spoils. And, with festival scene rival Camden Crawl shipped over to Dublin in 2013, the locale will likely be chomping at the bit to host an event that expresses the veracity of the areas musical mythology.

For many, it won’t be headliners The Subways or Reverend and the Makers that are the big draw (although the £25 ticket fee would get you little change from going to see either individually on any other night). It is in the malaise of the lower line-up that the rare stones can be found. Starting at the top, Turbowolf and Orange Goblin will be representing the more traditional end of the hard rock spectrum, whilst Hacktivist’s intense hip hop/metal crossover is sure to compliment the likes of the anarchic Gnarwolves, and slackers Nine Black Alps. Further down the list and there is a thread of uber aggressive noisemakers that can be traced through the likes of Hang the Bastard, Crazy Arm and The Hell – the latter of which are solely responsible for leaving Watford as the wasteland it is today. Even the famous London poseur will be catered for, thanks to Blitz Kids and The Blackout.

It may just be a hyperbole of a standard Camden evening, but when your starting point is the motherland for so many generations of musical genres, the magnification creates a heady brew. It’s on nights like these, when Dr. Martens delve into every dive bar from Dingwalls to Dublin Castle, that you can sense the ghosts of Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, The Clash and Ramones – even Winehouse. On that Saturday in late May, the music of the new generation will do the talking; Camden Rocks has seen to that. But, it’s rare to find a festival at which the talent will be conscious of playing second fiddle to the venue itself.

Tickets and lineup info are available now from the Camden Rocks Web site.

 

Luke’s Alphabet Tour – Q: Quadron at Camden Jazz Café – 19th September 2012

 
By on Monday, 24th September 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

Camden Town has long had the reputation of being one of the coolest places in London. An area of trendsetters, creatives and hip young things, all on the lookout for something fresh to call their own. As such a veritable smorgasbord of venues in Camden are operational almost every night, catering for mainstream rock acts at Koko, underground metallers at Purple Turtle a range of chart botherers at the Barfly. But there are one or two venues that offer a slightly different experience.

From the outside the Jazz Café looks like a run-of-the-mill venue conversion, but from within it’s a modern, blue-lit bar and stage with very suave clientèle. Sofas full of regulars and revellers face the now empty stage area that will soon be full of 300+ music-lovers for tonight’s sold out special.

Despite headlining the Jazz Café, Denmark’s Quadron don’t bare the hallmarks of Louis Armstrong or Miles Davis, and are often described as neo-soul thanks to their spacey, synthesised vibes and front woman Coco O’s staggering vocal ability. Tonight, though, in the confines of the high ceilinged, contemporary music lounge, the sound works and the capacity crowd are adrift in a sea of eccentric electronica.

Opening on the sublimely minimal ‘Buster Keaton’, London starts to sway to the sound of Coco’s angelic prowess. She stands at the front of the stage with flowers in her hair and a top that resembles chain mail – a juxtaposition in styles that Quadron themselves can relate to. As the funkier songs take the night up a gear, flirting with a Jackson 5-esque boogie, the band rein it in with the slower, more emotive songs in the vein of Little Dragon.

‘Pressure’ soothes in with a downtempo piano and Coco’s mindblowing operatic vocals, that leaves the Jazz Café in a stunned silence, before switching into a Supremes style groover shaker that kick starts the dancing feet of the hypnotised audience. It’s impossible to take your eyes off the stage, particularly the microphone as Denmark’s answer to Yukimi Nagano delivers flawless falsettos with ease.

For the obligatory encore, the neo-soulers try a little their hand at the King of Pop, with their cover of ‘Baby Be Mine’. Admittedly it’s not a song everyone in the venue seems to know, but in terms of musical ability Quadron cannot be faulted. They’ve managed to keep the largely non-singing crowd moving all evening, even instigating a brief bump ‘n’ grind, and it ends with a justly deserved rapturous round of applause. The Danish trio leave with Cheshire cat grins as do the fans rushing toward their bus home. No doubt we’ll be visited again soon.

 

Live Review: The Guardian New Band of the Day Live at Camden Barfly – 14th June 2012

 
By on Tuesday, 26th June 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

If you’re an avid fan of new music like us here at TGTF Towers, you’ll surely be aware of the constant problem we face: there’s just too much of it. Scenes are evolving into separate sub sects that inspires another bedroom artist, then someone throws a synth in to make it ‘electro’ or someone starts screaming to make it ‘core’, and before you know it that band you liked last week are no longer new. It’s no easy task to keep up with the ever-moving entity that is new music, but the Guardian’s Paul Lester has been making it his aim to stay on the cutting edge for around 1,300. His New Band of the Day column has taken Guardian Music by storm and led to a live showcase every few months in Camden, tonight is the third show and the line-up is as eclectic as ever.

Starting the evening is a Canadian-cum-German known as Digits. Despite the downstairs room looking like a primary school disco with the early-showers hanging around the edges, Digits’ moody synth-pop provides a welcome mirror image to the busy High Street outside. The honed ambience drags the slowly filling crowd away from their iPhones to watch the stage as Altman bleeps and hushes his way through ‘Because It’s Wrong’ and ‘So Cold’. It’s not get-up-and-dance music, but it’s as clever and passionate as The Weeknd and as dark as Cocteau Twins. With new EP ‘Where Do You Belong?’ out in July, Digits could find he belongs in London more often.

The first band to invite London upstairs tonight are Seasfire. Continuing from Digits’ emotive laments, the bass-laden electro indie kids are more chill-out than rock out. Vocalist Josh Thorn whispers his words delicately akin to Benjamin Francis Leftwich, while the band pull out the hooky, electronic grooves reminiscent of Everything Everything. Ranging from synthesised highs to dubsteppy lows, Seasfire add so many elements yet they reign it in and keep the sound resolutely soft and unique. Although the odd danceable section does make a leap forward the crowd are simply awe of the band about to steal James Blake‘s spotlight.

Back downstairs the Barfly has managed to cram in more people through the door to see the delightfully hippy the Hall Of Mirrors. With band members spilling off the stage, the harmonious six-piece wail like sirens of the sea, attracting weary travellers into their trap of twinkly instrumentals and Kate Bush-like vocals. The psychedelic antics are like a dream sequence inside a children’s music box that can turn nightmarishly ominous in the blink of an eye. Current single ‘Love Child’ is as quirky and offbeat as you could want but tonight’s audience aren’t all fans of the ’60s.

Late additions to the bill We Were Evergreen are welcoming gig-goers into their upstairs room for a half hour of folky fun. The concept of an upstairs/downstairs system seems to confuse some patrons who either appear mid-way through a set each time or remain on one floor throughout the event – missing half the acts in the process. But those who do make the journey to the first floor are treated to a display of ukulele fuelled summery vibes that Theme Park would be proud of. The trio from Paris have won over some fans through crowd-pleasers ‘Second Hand’ and ‘Vintage Car’. Although the combination of Hawaiian strings and kazoos was too much/little for some of the Barfly tonight, the mood has lifted and it’s time to party.

Closing the downstairs portion of the evening is the minimal maestro Bobby Tank.. As is his namesake, he comes rolling into the fray with tremendous force and gusto, levelling all before him. The underlying sound is ambient and full-on electronica, but with a Macbook and a table full of knobs and switches at his disposal, Bobby Tank introduces hints of glitch, 8-bit and dubstep into his deafening arsenal. As he stands alone on stage with the air growing thick with sweat around him, the front row is alive with arm throwers as Tank’s own jazzy moves infect the crowd. There are times where the music could hit harder and beats drop further, but the overall ambience is so catchy and simple it’s like the soundtrack to the flying level of your favourite Mega Drive game. But once the last key note has rung out, it’s back to the first floor for something more sinister than synth.

Headlining tonight’s extravaganza of new noise is the London-based former Cambridge University student, Kyla La Grange (pictured at top). Her enchanting onstage persona is boosted by the ominous purple lighting and mic stand covered in fairy lights – simple but effective. The haunting pop stylings of ‘Walk Through Walls’ and ‘Vampire Smile’ elevate the five-piece above their peers tonight to prove why they’re headlining (it’s an incredible metamorphosis from the last time TGTF saw Kyla). There’s a spooky feeling in the air tonight as Kyla dances around the stage with the suggestion her performance is some sort of séance to the beyond, coupled with her Zola Jesus-esque vocals it’s hypnotic to behold. If you spot these guys on the bill of any festivals you’re at this year, be there.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us

Privacy Policy

Keep TGTF online! Donate here.