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Coasts / October and November 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Thursday, 11th June 2015 at 8:00 am
 

Bristol’s Coasts are poised to release their self-titled debut album via Warner Music / Tidal / Good Soldier Records on the 4th of September.  They will follow that release with a run of live dates in the UK in October and November, including a London show at Shepherd’s Bush Empire on the 27th of October.  Below the tour date listing, you can watch the video for album track ‘Oceans’.

Tickets for the following shows go on general sale this Friday, the 12th of June, at 10 AM.  Previous TGTF coverage of Coasts can be found by clicking here.

Thursday 15th October 2015 – Cambridge Junction
Friday 16th October 2015 – Nottingham Rescue Rooms
Saturday 17th October 2015 – Newcastle Academy 2
Sunday 18th October 2015 – Glasgow Stereo Café Bar
Tuesday 20th October 2015 – Leeds Wardrobe
Thursday 22nd October 2015 – Manchester Gorilla
Friday 23rd October 2015 – Sheffield Leadmill
Saturday 24th October 2015 – Birmingham Library
Tuesday 27th October 2015 – London Shepherd’s Bush Empire
Wednesday 28th October 2015 – Norwich Waterfront
Friday 30th October 2015 – Brighton Concorde 2
Saturday 31st October 2015 – Bristol Marble Factory
Sunday 1st November 2015 – Southampton Engine Rooms

[youtube]https://youtu.be/P4qHQfbAkaQ[/youtube]

 

Coasts / June 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Monday, 13th April 2015 at 8:00 am
 

Bristol indie pop quintet Coasts will embark on a summer headline tour of “Coastal” seaside towns and riverside cities in the UK this June, culminating with their biggest headline show to date at the London Koko. They are also scheduled to make summer festival appearances at Isle of Wight, T in the Park, and Reading and Leeds.

Coasts’ new single ‘Modern Love’ will be released on the 27th of April, but you can view the official video for the track just below the tour date listing. Tickets for the following shows are available now. For previous TGTF coverage of Coasts, go here.

Tuesday 2nd June 2015 – Sunderland Independent
Wednesday 3rd June 2015 – Hull Fruit
Thursday 4th June 2015 – Liverpool Academy 2
Saturday 6th June 2015 – Aberystwyth University
Sunday 7th June 2015 – Cardiff Clwb Ifor Bach
Tuesday 9th June 2015 – Ramsgate Music Hall
Friday 19th June 2015 – Southend Chinnerys
Saturday 20th June 2015 – London Koko

[youtube]https://youtu.be/csDfQBG527Q[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2015 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #325: Coasts

 
By on Thursday, 15th January 2015 at 12:00 pm
 

Header photo by TGTF Head Photographer Martin Sharman at Live at Leeds 2014

With the success ginger-haired maestro Ed Sheeran has seen over the last year in the States, coupled with the rise to prominence of the next in a long-list of warbly voiced singer/songwriters like George Ezra, I can only see the now London-based Coasts career going in one direction. The band sound and look like they’ve been genetically engineered to be an A&R rep’s wet dream. The lead singer’s voice has the same inherent likeability which has seen Ezra and Sheeran do so well in the last year. Whilst the tunes wouldn’t sound out of place in a club, in a bar or on Radio 1 or 6Music, they’re intrinsically mass-marketable. And I’ve struggled to find what *not* to like about the four-piece.

OK, I’m jealous seeing as they’re destined to be incredibly successful and they’re four good-looking lads who say they spent most of their time whilst recording sessions playing Call of Duty and FIFA. I mean, their music is sounds effortless, so you can probably believe that they are dossing off on video games. But still, the melodies on ‘Wallow’ are reminiscent of the kind of multi-million selling grooves which Coldplay did quite well off of on 2011’s ‘Mylo Xyloto’. ‘Oceans’ has a chorus which demands to be remembered and a beat which refuses to be anything but toe-tappingly brilliant.

They’ve already got a pretty substantial following on social media, with more than 30,000 Facebook likes and almost 45,000 followers on Twitter, so it’s safe to say these guys are no secret. In fact with around many dates in the States announced for this year already, some of them already selling out, Coasts are going to no doubt be hot property at SXSW, with every big label, blog, Web site and agency running after tickets to their appearances.

This four-piece are sure to be one of the breakout hit bands of 2015. If their live performances can live up to what they’ve laid down digitally, then I’m positive we’ll not be able to turn a radio on for half an hour without getting blasted with Coasts.

 

Live at Leeds 2014 Review (Part 1)

 
By on Wednesday, 7th May 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

Live at Leeds has 24 venues, each with an average of 12 slots during the day. If my maths is correct, and assuming one has a Star Trek-style transporting machine which enables instant travel between one venue and the next, that means there are 24 ^ 12, or 36,500,000,000,000,000 different ways to schedule one’s day. Clearly a task that even the most musically-informed maths whiz would find a challenge. Thankfully, the lovely people at DIY had come up with such a tasteful and diverse lineup for their Brudenell Social Club residency, that such venue-hopping became almost entirely unnecessary.

TGTF’s day began with a very pleasant walk in beaming sunshine to the Faversham on the edge of the Leeds University campus, in a quest to kick everything off with a native Leeds band. Marsicans have got riffs and jangles and lovely Yorkshire-accented vocals, hooks you could hang a greatcoat on, all mixed together to generate the musical equivalent of an enormous grin on a summer’s day. They’ve got a single out, ‘Terrapin’, which is generously available for free, which is matched in jollity only by their previous release ‘Chivalry’, whose enormous singalong chorus is, if anything, an even more diligent earworm.

The walk from the Faversham to the Brudenell Social Club is a stage-setting experience in itself. The settled sandstone calmness of campus life gives way to tired yet still noble multi-storey brick terraces. Many residents sit on their front porches, smoking whilst taking in the sun. A 19th-century school has been demolished, leaving only rubble and temporary fencing as a bleak reminder of its proud history. Perhaps it’s the wrought-iron shutters across front doors and windows, or the scattering of dog-eared independent supermarkets, minicab firms and backstreet garages, which all conspire to create a distinctive atmosphere of, if not menace necessarily, then lives lived in complete indifference to the shiny artifice of Leeds’ city centre, lives in which concerns about protecting oneself from crime, or of how to pay the electricity bill, take higher precedence than another new shopping centre, or indeed the niceties of contemporary independent music.

Those few souls living in Burley or Woodhouse who are indeed partial to decent live music every night of the week are fortunate, because that is precisely what the Brudenell provides. The place is as aesthetically unattractive as venues get: architecturally lumpen, with a circular auditorium which does nothing for the acoustics. The interior bears the hallmarks of many an enthusiastic amateur DIYer. How appropriate for today’s residency. The PA in the main room is deafening – always bring ear plugs. But there’s no doubt that it’s also a deeply funky place, imbued with a century’s history of bacchanalia, repurposed as a live venue despite its physical shortcomings with more respect than any number of cookie-cutter chain pubs have for their former banking halls.

Ten minutes is all that TGTF gets of Bearfoot Beware, and it’s enough to determine that this self-confessed mathy three-piece can do tunes, funk, and boot-stamping riffs in equal measure and to an equally high standard. Imagine if Red Hot Chili Peppers were still good and decided to mix their loose funk with complex, bordering on atonal, guitar work, replete with diminished fifths, and theme their songs equally unconventionally. ‘My Love is a Seagull’ is a prime example: there’s two or three intense guitar themes, a bizarre hula drum interlude with all manner of swirling guitar effects; the final minute of instrumental call-and-response has bassist Ric Vowden bouncing and throwing shapes – as do, if they have any soul at all, the audience.

The biggest crowd of the afternoon is drawn for Parisian trio We Were Evergreen (pictured at top). And theirs is the trickiest set to describe. Imagine Manet’s A Bar At The Folie Bergère, then further imagine the late-19th century beat combo which might supply the background music: at once providing beautiful harmonies, a touch of twee sweetness, yet bathing in a decadent groove that is both inspired by and further encourages their city in its bohemian, bourgeois excess. Then bring those minstrels into the present day, equip them with looping pedals, synths, and a ukulele, and you are getting close to We Were Evergreen’s sound.

There’s a touch of Röyksopp in the way Michael Liot’s gentle delivery combines with the electronic beats and toy-like synth melodies, and in the rhythms that gently build to a danceable crescendo. But the songs don’t descend into by-numbers euphoricism: there’s solid songwriting chops on display. ‘False Start’ has a rock-solid chorus, complex, almost obscurantist lyrics, and a surfeit of beeps and bleeps to keep the most ardent electronica fan happy. Their debut album ‘Towards’ was essentially released at this gig – it’s officially out on the Monday hence but copies are on sale here – on the evidence of this performance it’s shaping up to be one of 2014’s essential purchases.

Coasts breeze onstage in a whirlwind of white denim, Doc Martens and wild-eyed charisma. In case one was in any doubt, they’ve brought a palm tree to reinforce their self-confessed trop-pop credentials. But that’s only half the story. With their big melodies and shape-throwing frontman they’re bidding for the affections of Hollyoaks viewers, The 1975 devotees, and any girl who cares to wear denim hotpants in the spring. Musically there’s nothing new about the sound – Fenech-Soler have been doing this Balearic-indie for years – but fair play for trying to breathe new life into this dance-related genre, even if it means that despite five members they still rely heavily on backing tracks to reinforce the dancefloor-friendly beats, one of which inevitably goes catastrophically wrong mid-song.

‘Rush of Blood’ relies on familiar saccharine tropes – “you took the beat in my heart / the words in my mouth / kept me out of the dark / you put the taste on my tongue / the life in my soul / give me air for my lungs”. Smitten, isn’t he? Their live performance reflects these motifs, the drama dialled up to 11 from beginning to end. The faux-sincere intensity does, frankly, wear a little thin after a while, with little in the way of dynamics to maintain interest across the whole set. Much like a takeaway burger, one’s hunger is quickly satiated by the carefully-engineered sensory button-pushing, but when it’s over all that’s left is a guilty, greasy aftertaste.

If Coasts are the class jocks, then Jarbird are the shy, retiring, bookish geeks quietly planning world domination from their perfectly-ordered desks right at the front of the class. In utter contrast to what’s gone before, they deliver fragile four-part harmonies and delicate instrumentation – live electronic drums vie with synth and the most skeletal of Stratocaster work – to create something quite unique and of a compelling, delicate beauty. Recent single ‘More Bad Celebrity Poetry’ evokes a deep sense of yearning melancholy, whilst somehow still remaining optimistic and uplifting – an impressive feat of composition. Clearly still a young band, they have an endearing humility to their presentation that comes as a refreshing change to those who clearly yearn for nothing less than to make themselves enormous in the music business. Jarbird, precisely because they let the music speak for itself, deserve to do very well indeed.

Stay tuned for part 2 of Martin’s riveting account of Live at Leeds 2014.

 

Preview: Live at Leeds Festival 2014

 
By on Friday, 2nd May 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

Live at Leeds is one of the most intense examples of one of the most intense of gig-going events: the one-dayer. Leeds boasts more than its fair share of fine venues, and Live at Leeds brings them together under one banner for 12 hours of fine new music. Your brave correspondent has attempted to listen to every one of the over 200 artists on offer – and failed. Therefore here’s a list of what stands out as a possible way to negotiate the myriad of combinations.

The Brudenell Social Club has a strong offer all day. We Were Evergreen (3 pm) trade in Parisian twee-pop blended with indie tunes: a fine, summery start. And after that, because the Brudenell has two stages, it’s one band after the other, every half hour. No time to even visit the bar. Dive In are from Glastonbury and offer chiming melodies and a voice uncannily similar to Brian Molko, if he was full of happy pills. Coasts have the nerve to call their latest single ‘A Rush Of Blood’ – and although there is a touch of Coldplay in some of their soaring choruses, they’re unlikely to be confused with the London behemoth: there’s a nice discordant solo in ‘Stay’, and ‘Wallow’ is almost like Bastille with big guitars. A mixed bag then, but certainly one worth assessing live.

Jarbird bring some admirably minimalist electronica overlaid with a lot of twisted, vocodered singing. And with a song called ‘More Bad Celebrity Poetry’ betraying a humourous cynicism, what’s not to like? Happyness, despite being from London, bring sunshine-on-a-string Americana – ‘It’s on You’ properly chugs like the Lemonheads, chock full of classic melodies and a college-rock slacker sensibility; ‘Montreal Rock Band Somewhere’ is a slow-burner, with a lazy bassline sketching out a groove and slurred vocals about drawing letters on one’s person. As you do. Woman’s Hour are a bit like a cross between Wild Beasts and The xx – which gives them a lot to live up to. They sound capable of it. With their debut album coming in July, now is a great time to check them out.

From smooth electropop to guitars – both Creases and Primitive Parts supply lo-fi riffing and retro rock ‘n’ roll beats. Primitive Parts clearly have one or two Graham Coxon records in their collection. Onwards: I can’t stop playing ‘Hiroshima’, a fine example of orchestral pop from Norway’s Highasakite. Ingrid Helene Håvik’s vocals are stunning, framed beautifully by the delicate instrumentation.

The 8 pm hour provides a dilemma – whether to make the 10-minute walk to The Packhorse to catch TGTF favourites The Orielles; perhaps a taxi ride to the Belgrave Music Hall to see the suave chamber delights of New York’s San Fermin, coming over all Tindersticks and Hem; or to stay at the Brudenell for an increasingly noisy night, kicking off with Montreal’s hard-riffing duo Solids. Indeed, the picture of where to be and what to hear becomes increasingly distant and hazy as the night draws in. Several hotly-tipped acts will have already been missed: Courtney Barnett, Flyte, Arthur Beatrice, and the headliners are either heavy-ish (Pulled Apart By Horses, Catfish And The Bottlemen (pictured at top), The Hold Steady), or poppy-ish (Clean Bandit, King Charles). Leeds’ very own I Like Trains set up a homecoming gig at Leeds Town Hall, celebrating 10 years in the biz.

In short, there’s something for everyone, and nobody can see everything, so it’s probably best to go with the flow and not worry too much about it. Or just spend all day at the Brudenell. See you there…

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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