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LeeFest Presents: The Neverland 2016 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 5th August 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

When you think of Neverland, you consider the following synonymous: timelessness, youthful vigour and a certain transcendence. In the middle of a forest in Kent, near Edenbridge, Neverland became a reality through the help of Lee and his homegrown festival Leefest 2016. Though the weather was not quite ideal upon first landing, it was far from an issue. The moment you wandered into the main arena, it was clear the only thing that would stop a good time being had would be those adult thoughts that should’ve been, at this point, relegated to the outside world. Neverland’s sole purpose over these 3 days was to be a vehicle for your removal from society and instead to provide you a good time.

Split into three main sections, The Neverwoods (main arena), Mermaids Lagoon (rave central) and Skull Ridge (rock city), you were never far from some form of entertainment. The introductory day, Thursday, saw the smallest of the lineup but definitely the strongest. With only Tootles Circus, your average festival tent, operating as a stage, all four acts were nice and accessible. Peluche and Loyle Carner eased the gaining crowd in, but it was the main attractions of Everything Everything and Ghostpoet (pictured at top) who garnered in the big numbers. With Everything Everything, they perfectly stoked the crowd’s fire and brought their unique blend of rapturous choruses and genre bending music. Conversely, Ghostpoet gave the tent a dark atmosphere with his blend of hip-hop-cum-rock-assault.

Friday brought forth the first full day affair, with Peluche once again kicking proceedings off, but this time on the main stage, aka the ‘Bangerang’ stage. The overall setup of the main arena was easily navigated but with the two stages being centrally located, sound spill was inevitable. Fortunately this didn’t happen frequently, though it’s a dangerous game to play. Highlights from the second day included Corey Fox-Fardell and his brand of songwriter electro melding, which was a particularly pleasant listen whilst grazing in front of the Bangerang stage. Little Simz proved why she is one to watch in the UK hip-hop game, leading the enthusiastic crowd through numerous chants as she dominated the beats surrounding her. In a similar fashion, Roots Manuva brought domineering and commanding beats that just reinforced the entire notion behind LeeFest: you can be who you want, and listen to what you want, as long as you have a good time. Rockers, hip-hoppers and the like were all moving and shaking to the sounds that flowed from the Bangerang stage.

Current London-based pop troubadour Oscar provided his blend of melodic darling instrumentation and baritone vocals. One thing’s for sure, you can’t not have a good time at an Oscar show, no matter the crowd size or venue. Dinosaur Pile-Up sat on top of the kingdom of chaos and noise after a headlining set at the Hook Rock stage in the Skull Ridge. It’s was a venue reminiscent of small clubs, where the noise cascades from all orifices and you’re able to lose yourself in the darkness amongst your other perspiring peers. Barrelling through their grunge/punk hybrid hits, the volume was overbearing at the front. We recommend you watch from a safe distance if you’re stupid enough to forget ear protection (a particular note to self).

The final day started off in stereotypical British style, with grey clouds and intermittent rain, but this didn’t affect the atmosphere. Hannah Lou Clark was a particular highlight: sans band, she used both her pure talents and an iPod to create a wonderfully relaxed and charming environment. Everybody’s favourite indie twosome We Are Scientists provided a particularly raucous set that included singer Keith Murray venturing deep into the crowd during ‘Textbook’, where he proceeded to enlist the help of a particularly fluorescent orange Poseidon who was amongst the crowd. Following these shenanigans was current electro-indie darling Shura, having released her debut album ‘Nothing’s Real’ in July. Delivering a captivating set that never failed to both strike you emotively and melodically, the biggest draw of Shura live is the fact she is clearly there because of the sheer love and devotion for her art. She knows what she likes to dance to and fortunately, we do too.

Originally announced to take place on the Thursday, after a mishap with the programs and the cat being let out of the bag early, the not-so-secret secret set from Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes Saturday evening was the perfect climax to this weekend of escapism and release. The pure fury that comes with any Frank Carter show is cathartic enough to make sure you leave with a weightlessness, one that can only be achieved by taking part in both a circle pit and storming the stage, two things this fortunate writer was seen doing.

After all is said and done, the aforementioned sole purpose of LeeFest was achieved. With pirates and lost boys running around shooting each other with water pistols and climbing aboard the decorative dens around the stages, it was impossible to not get lost in the affair. A festival that catered to both families and those of all ages looking to simply cut loose, the promise this event holds is even grander than its current fasthon. Considering this was Leefest’s largest year yet, the sky’s the limit. And with the lead lost boy at the helm, LeeFest could very well be a major player for years to come.

 

Dinosaur Pile-Up / November 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Tuesday, 4th August 2015 at 9:00 am
 

Dinosaur Pile-Up are gearing up to release their third album ‘Eleven Eleven’ on the 16th of October on SO Recordings. Produced by Tom Dalgety (Royal Blood), this sounds like it could be quite punishing, judging from the sound of the grungey and riff-filled ‘Grim Valentine’, a single that will precede the album with its release on the 2nd of October. Have a listen to the single under the tour dates, which are all on sale now.

Monday 2nd November 2015 – Birmingham Rainbow
Tuesday 3rd November 2015 – Newcastle Think Tank
Wednesday 4th November 2015 – Glasgow King Tut’s
Friday 6th November 2015 – Manchester Ruby Lounge
Saturday 7th November 2015 – Leeds Key Club
Sunday 8th November 2015 – Nottingham Bodega
Monday 9th November 2015 – Norwich Waterfront Studio
Wednesday 11th November 2015 – London Tufnell Park Dome
Thursday 12th November 2015 – Bristol Exchange
Friday 13th November 2015 – Brighton Hope

 

MP3 of the Day #755: Dinosaur Pile-Up

 
By on Tuesday, 4th June 2013 at 10:00 am
 

Leeds trio Dinosaur Pile-Up are offering up a free download of their track ‘Hanging By a Thread’ on their Facebook page, if you simply ‘Like’ their page. Go here to get the mp3.

The band will be on tour in the UK in July; the mayhem begins the 3rd of July in Newcastle. Tickets are on sale now.

Wednesday 3rd July 2013 – Newcastle Think Tank
Thursday 4th July 2013 – Dundee Beat Generator
Friday 5th July 2013 – Aberdeen Tunnels
Sunday 7th July 2013 – Glasgow King Tuts
Monday 8th July 2013 – Hull Fruit
Tuesday 9th July 2013 – York Duchess
Wednesday 10th July 2013 – Leeds Brudenell Social Club
Friday 12th July 2013 – Manchester Ruby Lounge
Saturday 13th July 2013 – Liverpool Shipping Forecast
Sunday 14th July 2013 – Cardiff Buffalo Bar
Monday 15th July 2013 – Birmingham Flapper
Wednesday 17th July 2013 – London Cargo
Thursday 18th July 2013 – Southampton Joiners
Friday 19th July 2013 – Bristol Louisiana
Saturday 20th July 2013 – Brighton Hope

 

Great Escape 2013: John’s Day 1 Roundup

 
By on Wednesday, 29th May 2013 at 1:00 pm
 

As I stepped foot on the platform of Brighton station, I was met with not the 65 MPH winds that I was foretold, but instead with flecks of sunshine and a bustling throng of people ahead of me. So I trundled cautiously down the street wrapped in my cardigan and carrying my rather inconspicuous suitcase, I walked past The Hope, where my first live music experience of The Great Escape 2013 would take place.

Who would be that first experience? Well, a band that I came upon, completely by chance at The Great Escape 2011, by the name of Brother and Bones. Their signature brand of acoustic-driven stompery, which struck a real accord with me then wasn’t the centre point of their set this time around.

Instead, the focal point was that of Richard Thomas’ majestic vocal talents. The all out hoe-downery of their past shows was forgotten in favour of the more sensitive and subtle touch. Whether it was the best approach ion the tight confines of the Hope, is up for debate, but regardless of that Thomas and co.’s elegant harmonies struck an accord with the partisan audience of critics, A & R’s and the rest. Fully acoustic number ‘Gold and Silver’ was a mixture of what is brilliant about Brother and Bones though, fully showcasing the vocal prowess of Richard, whilst drawing attention to the elegance of the songwriting. (7/10)

After a brief interlude for a spot of Tiffin and a change of clothes to more sun-appropriate attire, I headed to The Warren to catch hotly tipped Tom Odell. After a reasonable amount of time queuing for an act, whom I believed was overhyped but worth a listen, I ended up in the staging area of the venue. A kind of Secret Garden Party / 2000 Trees hybrid in the middle of Brighton. Quaint? Yes. But after quarter of an hour longer waiting I lost patience and decided to head to The Prince Albert for some light folk.

Now Dancing Years (pictured at top) are an entirely different kind of prospect to what I expected. Going in relatively unprepared, I was expecting some wobbly synths, dodgy time signatures and all the other indie clichés that we love and loathe in equal measure. What I was met with was a touching mix of melancholic folk, but with the focal point of David Henshaw, in a more understated fashion than Brother and Bones earlier. In fact, the show revolved around the man, with the gentle violin being drowned out by his obvious talent.

He came across as a kind of squeaky clean Jack Steadman / Will Harvey hybrid. Resolute in stance, yet face-to-face as personable as any frontman, he makes the perfect central point for Dancing Years. The band’s gentle melodies are only going to see their stock gather strength and with shades of Dry the River interspersed amongst the soaring harmonies, they make for easy listening. Add to that equation that big hitters like Seymour Stein were in the audience and you’ve got ones to watch right here people. The only disappointment was the rather sparse crowd, probably owing to the venues distance from the main swarm of events. (8/10)

The allure of something raw like Dingus Khan was too much after the sheened sounds of Dancing Years, so off to the Hope I rattled my broken body. Only to be met by a sprawling queue, which while being entertaining in the characters I met, who included a Dingus Khan fan from Warner Music, a 19-year old PA for We Were Evergreen’s manager. and two bookers from the Netherlands’ PinkPop festival, who I’d like to note had some fantastic hairstyles.

And while the conversation was stimulating, the popularity of Dingus proved too much, as I was not allowed into the venue. However, I am reliably informed by Ollie McCormack of Top Button Digital that they were brilliant, and that the album is great to shake of the cobwebs of TGE on a Monday.

Following up from the disappointment of missing Dingus, I stumbled into the Hope for the second time that day to catch Dinosaur Pile-Up. Another Leeds-based outfit that in 2011 provided me with the scenes of the most chaotic gig in my memory, with stage invasions galore, circle pits aplenty and an appropriate amount of urine in plastic cups. It’s a festival, eh?

This set was a far more restrained affair, with the audience only really getting into it properly in the final few songs. Dinosaur Pile-Up’s hectic, strangled shredding should have been perfect for this venue, with shoulders pressed firmly against the walls by band and punters alike. ‘Mona Lisa’ kept its attraction and proved the hub of the set for me musically. Nevertheless, the moment of the short set was when a circle pit broke out at the front, and the smile of the veteran moshers face next to me as he watched with glee at the chaos unfolding, albeit momentarily in front of him. (6/10)

 

Video of the Moment #1184: Dinosaur Pile-Up

 
By on Sunday, 21st April 2013 at 10:00 am
 

This song is the hippest of the hip, But see, Dinosaur Pile-Up decided to take cues from Hitchcock and Tarantino and well…you get the video for ‘Derail’. Watch it below. It’s graphic at times so yeah, keep the kids away from this one.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONLYyef_m_g[/youtube]

 

(Great Escape 2011!) Live Review: Dinosaur Pile-Up at Brighton Jam – 13th May 2011

 
By on Thursday, 26th May 2011 at 1:00 pm
 

The 200-capacity Jam has been described as almost like watching a gig through a letterbox. But for a punter who is 6 foot 5 inches like me, it wasn’t the most comfortable of venues to watch the gig in. Dinosaur Pile-Up though don’t write easy watching music; they write heavy, grungy, seriously hardcore tunes. Songs that you don’t want to stand still and watch. No: these are songs that you want to jump up and down too, songs that you want to charge into the mosh pit, beer in hand, and cause some serious damage too.

So at quarter to ten on the Friday of the Great Escape, Dinosaur Pile-Up entered the stage and chaos ensued. As the Leeds three piece powered through their 30-minute long set, the crowd got more and more rowdy, until at last during the band’s last song, the crowd invaded the stage and joined their newfound heroes on stage. The energy of this band though is infectious; tunes like ‘Traynor’ brought the crowd to boiling point and really showed the Jam some serious modern day grunge. Their influences were obviously Nirvana, in their song writing and their music, but what band of this generation can say they are not influenced by Dave Grohl’s old band and is that really a bad thing?

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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