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Live Gig Video: Shura shares ‘Three Years’ performance film, playing ‘2Shy’, ‘Touch’ and ‘Indecision’

 
By on Tuesday, 16th June 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

London via Manchester and Russia electropop artist Shura has revealed a new self-described performance film called ‘Three Years’ for her fans to enjoy. In it, she and her band perform three popular singles she’s released over the last year, all with a decided ’80s synthpop touch reminiscent of early Madonna: ‘2Shy’, ‘Touch’ and ‘Indecision’. It’s a lovely video with clips of Shura on tour as well as of contemplative moments alone with her music, as if it’s a peek into her personal life. I wish more artists had the money and desire to put out something like this that’s different than a straight live video put out as a promo. Watch it below.

Just last week, Shura announced a new UK tour for September and October 2015; all the dates are listed here. She showcased at this year’s SXSW 2015, and you can read my thoughts on her appearance at the Huw Stephens-curated Music Wales : Cerdd Cymru showcase Tuesday night in Austin here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTWrMp_tYx8[/youtube]

 

San Cisco / September 2015 English Tour

 
By on Thursday, 11th June 2015 at 9:00 am
 

Australian indie pop quartet San Cisco will return to the UK this September for a brief run of live dates around the release of their next single ‘Magic’.  ‘Magic’ appears on San Cisco’s second album ‘Gracetown’, which was released on the 6th of April.  You can watch the new video for ‘Magic’ just below the tour date listing.

Tickets for the following shows go on sale this Friday, the 12th of June, at 10 AM.  On that same day, San Cisco will begin a North American tour before returning to Australia for scheduled live dates in July.

Previous TGTF coverage of San Cisco can be found here.

Tuesday 15th September 2015 – London Village Underground
Wednesday 16th September 2015 – Manchester Sound Control Basement
Thursday 17th September 2015 – Bristol Thekla

[youtube]https://youtu.be/Q4US8rn7cWc[/youtube]

 

Starsailor / October 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Thursday, 11th June 2015 at 8:30 am
 

Following the hiatus of lead vocalist James Walsh, whose debut solo album ‘Turning Point’ was released last year, Manchester four-piece Starsailor have reunited and announced a 13-date headline tour of the UK for this October.  Starsailor’s most recent LP release was 2009’s ‘All The Plans’; their debut album ‘Love Is Here’ went platinum in the UK in 2001.  Below the tour date listing, you can view the official video for a track from that album titled ‘Alcoholic’.

Ahead of their October live dates, Starsailor are currently touring North America with Yorkshire alt-rockers Embrace.  Tickets for the following shows go on sale tomorrow, Friday, the 12th of June, at 9 AM.

You can peruse TGTF’s previous coverage of Starsailor right back here.

Friday 2nd October 2015 – Liverpool Academy
Saturday 3rd October 2015 – Manchester Albert Hall
Sunday 4th October 2015 – Newcastle Riverside
Monday 5th October 2015 – Glasgow ABC
Wednesday 7th October 2015 – Leeds Beckett Students Union
Thursday 8th October 2015 – Wolverhampton Wulfrun Hall
Friday 9th October 2015 – Northampton Roadmender
Sunday 11th October 2015 – Norwich Waterfront
Monday 12th October 2015 – Cambridge Junction
Tuesday 13th October 2015 – Leicester Academy
Thursday 15th October 2015 – Oxford Academy
Friday 16th October 2015 – Bristol Bierkeller
Saturday17th October 2015 – London Shepherd’s Bush Empire

[youtube]https://youtu.be/UA6C_0ERHww[/youtube]

 

Coasts / October and November 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Thursday, 11th June 2015 at 8:00 am
 

Bristol’s Coasts are poised to release their self-titled debut album via Warner Music / Tidal / Good Soldier Records on the 4th of September.  They will follow that release with a run of live dates in the UK in October and November, including a London show at Shepherd’s Bush Empire on the 27th of October.  Below the tour date listing, you can watch the video for album track ‘Oceans’.

Tickets for the following shows go on general sale this Friday, the 12th of June, at 10 AM.  Previous TGTF coverage of Coasts can be found by clicking here.

Thursday 15th October 2015 – Cambridge Junction
Friday 16th October 2015 – Nottingham Rescue Rooms
Saturday 17th October 2015 – Newcastle Academy 2
Sunday 18th October 2015 – Glasgow Stereo Café Bar
Tuesday 20th October 2015 – Leeds Wardrobe
Thursday 22nd October 2015 – Manchester Gorilla
Friday 23rd October 2015 – Sheffield Leadmill
Saturday 24th October 2015 – Birmingham Library
Tuesday 27th October 2015 – London Shepherd’s Bush Empire
Wednesday 28th October 2015 – Norwich Waterfront
Friday 30th October 2015 – Brighton Concorde 2
Saturday 31st October 2015 – Bristol Marble Factory
Sunday 1st November 2015 – Southampton Engine Rooms

[youtube]https://youtu.be/P4qHQfbAkaQ[/youtube]

 

Live Gig Video: SOAK performs ‘B a Nobody’ and ‘Blud’ in New York for La Blogotheque

 
By on Wednesday, 10th June 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

Back in March before she landed in Austin for SXSW 2015, SOAK (aka young Derry singer/songwriter Bridie Monds-Watson) filmed this pretty special live performance in New York City for French Web site La Blogotheque. Watch the arresting video below. ‘B a Nobody’ and ‘Blud’ feature prominently on the young lady’s debut album for Rough Trade Records, ‘Before We Forgot How to Dream’, which Carrie reviewed in late May.

You can see SOAK live this autumn in the UK, for the singer/songwriter has announced a massive UK tour for October and November 2015. Read all our past articles on SOAK here on TGTF through this link.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlP-PIqK4DQ[/youtube]

 

Liverpool Sound City 2015: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 5th June 2015 at 3:00 pm
 

Ten years ago, staring at MTV Rocks on the television with my Dad, the lyrics “she don’t use butter, she don’t use cheese, she don’t use jelly or any of these” set me on a path. A path which started with me purchasing the rest of The Flaming Lips‘ back catalogue in one bulk purchase, and ended at Liverpool Sound City on The Atlantic Stage, with a sensory overload courtesy of Wayne Coyne and co. A fantastic booking for the festival.

But before then, I of course had to get to the festival, which as I learnt on the Thursday, is no mean feat – seeing as it is a good 30 minute walk from the main Liverpool city centre. My solution? A rented bike, a tactic that when I whizzed past the thousands of revellers waiting for taxis (for an hour and a half in some cases) and stumbling drunkenly back to the City Centre made me incredibly smug, and the revellers entirely mugged off.

Once I’d locked up outside of the new festival site, which looks certain to be the festival’s home for the foreseeable future, I ventured to The Atlantic Stage for a set that would begin a week of social media awkwardness. Almost supergroup The Serpent Power were gracing the stage, made up of Ian Skelly (The Coral) and Paul Molloy (The Zutons) and a few other less well-knowns…

The result, an utterly forgettable set full of wallpaper music:- the kind of self-indulgent psychedelia with noodling solos galore that you’d expect from a super group, but perhaps not one with the song-writing credentials The Serpent Power brought with them. With droves of punters at The Atlantic Stage deciding to make haste somewhere else, it was obvious their brand of new indie was really striking accord with the flower crown in their hair bunch and not much else.

So when I tweeted the following:


I didn’t really expect to wake up the next day with The Serpent Power feeling I had struck a nerve:

Now while they may have got it spot on about my run-of-the-mill willy, the set was still sub-par. The ‘banter’ was probably the highlight, so maybe social-media comedy is the way to go? But as the cliché goes, don’t give up your day jobs. (5/10)

From the largest stage, to the smallest: Service Bells were next up on The Record Store stage, which effectively was just a small tent with speakers and the ability to sell records. The intimate surroundings lent to Service Bells’ set superbly, as their Queens of the Stone Age-influenced rock bounced and reverberated within the tight confines. Over waves of feedback, Fraser Harvey’s cutting vocals hit the back of the tent, their visceral drum and guitar assault working to draw a packed out crowd into the tight confines. Although their set was brief, they teased perfectly to their later performance on The Kraken Stage, by giving just a taste of the aggression of their music. (7/10)

From blood and guts rock ‘n’ roll, it was on to alternative new wave electronica with Dutch Uncles on The Atlantic Stage. It’s a bit of a departure but a welcome one, as the four-piece pull out all the stops to make it a feast for the senses. Despite the rather overcast and glum setting in Liverpool, Dutch Uncles serve up an almost samba beat, with hips shaking and a calypso rhythm uniting the audience in their booty shaking. Duncan Wallis juts and throws his way around the stage as Andy Proudfoot, Robin Richards and Peter Broadhead provide a glittering calypso boogie. Their colourful backdrop and the verve and enthusiasm imbued in their performance meant gave a summery outlook for what was a rather gloomy setting, as they transported us to a beach, ‘Club Tropicana’ style.

Striking an uncanny resemblance to Game Of Thrones character plump, yet loveable buffoon Samwell Tarly, lead singer of the next band Leon Stanford captured the entire crowd with his wit and lack of comprehension for how close all the stages were. In honesty, the Tarly lookalike had a point seeing as what could be made of his beautiful Gaslight Anthem-esque vocals was mostly drowned out by the thumping bass emerging from The Cargo Stage behind him.

Despite these facts, The People and the Poet cut through the walls of sonic obscurity as well as they could and played a brilliant set. The storytelling was encapsulating and Stanford’s cutting wit meant your attention was affixed to the Welsh four-piece. My only confusion was how Welsh they sounded speaking, and how un-Welsh they sounded making music. In fact, it felt more like a band from the Midwest of America, which did have me scratching my head. Despite the tonal confusions, The People and the Poet stood out on the Saturday as arguably the stand out band with their brilliant turns of phrase and superb delivery, even in the face of adversity… (8/10)

The joyful summer party atmosphere of Dutch Uncles was supplanted at The Baltic Stage, giant empty warehouse, by the feeling of a proper old-school punk show, courtesy of aged-retainers The Membranes. Old-school punk has a certain, er, look. The Membranes, quite simply ARE that look: shirts off, muscles rippling, dodgy haircuts that they probably couldn’t pull off 30 years ago and are no closer to doing so now and a menacing look upon the frontman’s face. They were every bit the grizzled bunch of punkers that the tagline ‘still inspired by punk rock but believe music has no boundaries’ conjures up.

It’s not exactly note perfect, and ‘gritty’ is probably the best word to describe it as, with most of the audience affixed to the wrinkled prune John Robb marauding menacingly around the front echelons of the stage. For most of the set, regrettably for the aged-retainers, their post-punk growls and riffs just didn’t strike an accord, until their final hurrah when the band rallied for a rousing call and return effort. Stellar work for guys who look like they may need a defibrillator post-set. (7/10)

After a brief top-up at one of the beer tents, which looked drastically overstaffed and dramatically overegged for the actual level of trade they would be receiving throughout the weekend, I made my way to the end of the pier at The Atlantic Stage for a moment I’d waited more than a decade for. As the light of the sun disappeared and the artificial light began to illuminate the small strip of tarmac the crowd were kettled into, the stage was draped with various plastic tubes for the light-fantastic The Flaming Lips were about to set up. In true Wayne Coyne style, he helped with the soundcheck resplendent in his green latex froggy suit, with the rest of the band dressed equally as colourfully and dotted around the stage, intertwined in the maze of dangling tubes.

Coyne and co. began with a ballad in the form of ‘The Abandoned Hospital Ship’, a jangling soaring journey through the psyche of this era-defining trio. That’s all before The Flaming Lips really begin their orgy for the senses, with cannons full of ticker tape and a ‘Fight Test’ singalong, as giant blow up aliens join Coyne on stage. As Coyne takes us through a quick tour of the bands most successful singles, he stops the audience midway through a slowed down singalong of ‘Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, Part 1’. “I don’t know whether you KNOW how important the HYAH HYAH bit of Yoshimi is, but Coyne bellows, “it’s a marker as to the level of crazy the audience is”. Most of the crowd loomed around baffled, but as it came to the HYAH HYAH portion of the song, we got a proper shout from the audience.

The set never really peaked to a mass singalong, simply for the fact that most of the audience didn’t know a lot of the songs. But the encore of ‘Do You Realize?’ was a soaring chorus across Liverpool Sound City with everyone getting caught up in the lights and excitement of The Flaming Lips.

Despite this, disappointingly due to the niche market The Flaming Lips occupy the crowd never really fully got on board with the set on a musical level. As far as a feast for the eyes, they delivered a 10/10 performance, but musically there was a lack of connection as a band who have disappointed with its last three records struggled to hold the interest of the crowd. (7/10)

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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