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Miles Kane / May and June 2013 English Tour

 
By on Friday, 29th March 2013 at 8:00 am
 

Miles Kane will be touring England in May and June. Tickets to this tour go on sale Friday the 5th of April at 9 AM.

Kane’s newest album ‘Don’t Forget Who You Are’ will be released on the 3rd of June. He also recently appeared on the NME Awards tour alongside Django Django, Palma Violets and Peace. Our North East correspondent Martin Sharman caught the tour in Newcastle, and you can read his account of the night along with viewing his amazing photos here.

Saturday 4th May 2013 – Holmfirth Picturehouse
Sunday 5th May 2013 – Sunderland Independent
Monday 6th May 2013 – Middlesbrough Empire
Saturday 11th May 2013 – Oxford Academy
Sunday 12th May 2013 – Bath Komedia
Tuesday 14th May 2013 – York Duchess
Saturday 1st June 2013 – Birmingham Academy 2
Sunday 2nd June 2013 – Manchester Ruby Lounge
Friday 7th June 2013 – London Dingwalls (album launch party)
Monday 10th June 2013 – Northampton Roadmender
Tuesday 11th June 2013 – Bedford Corn Exchange

 

Live Review: NME Awards Tour featuring Django Django, Miles Kane, Palma Violets and Peace at Newcastle Academy – 7th February 2013

 
By on Wednesday, 13th February 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

The NME Awards Tour is a long-established way to kick off the musical year with a quartet of bands that gathered plaudits in the preceding months. This year, we have Brummie style from Peace, noisy London shenanigans from Palma Violets, Liverpudlian swagger from Miles Kane, and sort-of-Scottish art-pop from Django Django. Surely something for everyone, and TGTF was there in Newcastle on opening night to see how things went down.

Peace NME Awards 2013

One’s heart goes out to Peace: their set began just as the Academy’s doors were opening, meaning the crowd was more stunted than they deserve. Nevertheless, there were whoops and hollers aplenty from a knot of dedicated fans right down the front. And any plaudits coming their way are well-deserved. Peace have a knack of honing in on any particular guitar music sound from the last couple of decades, and brilliantly recreating it as their own. ‘Follow Baby’ is a fine bit of pop-baggy last heard from EMF in the very early ‘90s. ‘Wraith’, shorn of its dubious blaxsploitation visuals is altogether more considered, with its funky guitar chops and enormous singalong chorus revealing a fine almost-love song.

But where Peace really sound most at home is in the unashamed power ballad ‘California Daze’. Sweet, sweeping backing vocals melt into a gentle guitar figure, the drums kick things up a gear about 90 seconds in, and the emotion is unashamed. A true lighters-in-the-air moment, which shows their maturity as songwriters and talent as performers. Perhaps for my sins, in the widescreen guitars and breadth of scope, I was reminded of a young U2. Peace deserve the latter band’s wider recognition, and tonight is a decent step towards achieving that.

Palma Violets
(pictured at top) eschew subtlety in favour of noise, wild abandon, and onstage theatricality. Their sound owes a lot to punk – I’m sure there’s one or two Sex Pistols and Clash records in Sam Fryer’s parents’ record collection. Vocals are artfully tweaked out of tune, instrumentation is simple: a synth organ parping underneath distorted guitars. Fryer and bassist Chilli Jesson have a sweaty bromance going on, mic stands intimately close together, double-headed guitar action never far away. Certainly this is raucous, powerful stuff live, artfully lo-fi (as per the obvious and unnecessary tape noise on their recorded material). Are they the true heirs to the art-punk throne? Until their forthcoming album is properly analysed for the presence of decent songs, the jury is still out, but they’re certainly a fun way to spend half an hour.

Miles Kane NME Awards 2013

As Miles Kane takes the stage, it becomes pretty clear that the crowd is his. Perhaps this is because, as his Wikipedia entry states, he is “very attractive”, or perhaps it’s the glint of his diamanté slippers that prove irresistible. Whatever the cause, the audience are big Kane fans, and he doesn’t disappoint them. Having been in bands since the age of 18, Kane knows a thing or two about throwing an onstage shape – for any young trainee frontmen watching, this was a masterclass in the art of swagger. Kane knows this is his big chance, and has got his pedal pressed hard to the floor. Imagine Liam Gallagher’s vocal sneer, his brother’s guitar technique, Alex Turner’s way with a tune, and Paul Weller’s haircut, and we have Miles Kane – a patchwork dadrock man in leather trousers.

But then again, there’s a big hole right now where all the big beasts used to prowl. So step forward Miles Kane, a pseudo-tribute to them all, to keep the guitar-loving public downloading content for the time being. The fact is, most people know what they like, and like what they know, and what they know is what Miles Kane is offering. If that sounds like damning with faint praise, it isn’t really. Kane is 100% professional, committed, and no box in the rock playbook is left unticked tonight. And, cynicism aside, that’s not an easy feat to pull off.

Django Django NME Awards 2013

And so it’s left to Django Django to top that. And frankly, it’s a little too much of a jarring contrast to really work well, as the Djangos’ artful and considered musings requiring a little too much concentration in comparison with Kane’s balls-to-the-wall rock. Most of the crowd do stick around, although the atmosphere is noticeably more subdued than previously. Perhaps this is all the better to hear the subtleties in the music, of which their multi-layered arrangements are full. There’s the echo of The Beta Band throughout, which can only be a good thing. To their own audience, with the correct support, Django Django would make a lot more sense. As it is, they are a little too cerebral for the headline slot here tonight. Perhaps a less fickle crowd might await them in other parts of the country…

Overall, this is five-star entertainment: four set of deeply professional musicians, playing somewhere around the top of their game. If you want to find out about new bands before everyone else, this is not the event for you. If you’ve not been paying attention over the last 12 months or so, or just can’t be bothered to keep up, a quick trip to the NME Tour every winter should get you right up to speed with where pop music is right now. That would be a pretty good place, then.

 

Video of the Moment #1103: Miles Kane

 
By on Saturday, 26th January 2013 at 6:04 pm
 

Miles Kane‘s newest video for ‘Give Up’ is a visual with Kane banging on his guitar on a stage, with a woman writhing on a video behind him (disturbing, at least to me; it’s garnering great response from the male commentators of YouTube, though). With blistering audio, it’s worth watching if only for the music. Catch it below.

‘Give Up’ will be released as a single on the 24th of February digitally as a 4-track EP via iTunes, with a limited edition 7″ vinyl format available on the 25th. The song will feature on Kane’s second album, due out later this year. Kane and his band support NME Awards tour headliner Django Django starting the 7th of February in Newcastle, but they have two headline dates of their own in Wrexham and Reading on the 4th and 5th February, respectively (unfortunately, both of those dates are sold out).

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiMXaM5um6I[/youtube]

Monday 4th February 2013 – Wrexham Central Station (sold out)
Tuesday 5th February 2013 – Reading Sub89 (sold out)
Thursday 7th February 2013 – Newcastle Academy *
Friday 8th February 2013 – Manchester Academy*
Saturday 9th February 2013 – Leeds Academy *
Monday 11th February 2013 – Glasgow Academy *
Tuesday 12th February 2013 – Nottingham Rock City *
Wednesday13th February 2013 – Liverpool Academy*
Friday 15th February 2013 – Norwich UEA*
Saturday 16th February 2013 – Birmingham Academy*
Sunday 17th February 2013 – Cardiff Uni Great Hall *
Tuesday 19th February 2013 – Bristol Academy*
Wednesday 20th February 2013 – Bournemouth Academy *
Thursday 21st February 2013 – Brighton Dome *
Sunday 23rd February 2013 – London Brixton Academy*

 

NME Awards Tour / February 2013

 
By on Tuesday, 4th December 2012 at 9:30 am
 

The 2013 edition of the NME Awards Tour will be headlined by Django Django (pictured above). The supports will be Miles Kane, Palma Violets and Peace. Tickets are on sale now but going fast.

Thursday 7th February 2013 – Newcastle Academy
Friday 8th February 2013 – Manchester Academy
Saturday 9th February 2013 – Leeds Academy
Monday 11th February 2013 – Glasgow Academy
Tuesday 12th February 2013 – Nottingham Rock City
Wednesday13th February 2013 – Liverpool Academy
Friday 15th February 2013 – Norwich UEA
Saturday 16th February 2013 – Birmingham Academy
Sunday 17th February 2013 – Cardiff Uni Great Hall
Tuesday 19th February 2013 – Bristol Academy
Wednesday 20th February 2013 – Bournemouth Academy
Thursday 21st February 2013 – Brighton Dome
Sunday 23rd February 2013 – London Brixton Academy

 

Evolution Weekender 2012: Day 1 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 15th June 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

Author’s note: This festival is not meant for me. The admissions policy admits anyone of 14 years of age or over without a chaperone, making this event one of the most significant dates in the social calendar for pre-legal-drinking-age schoolchildren. The fact that there were several bands on the bill that appealed to me seems nothing more than a coincidence in hindsight. So I pray the reader will forgive what may come across as something of a grumpy outlook in the forthcoming prose. I would have loved to have heard the bands properly, but the sound of a thousand squeaky voices dominated. Here we go…

Not long into his first song, headliner Dizzee Rascal halts proceedings to allow several paramedics to safely extract a particularly distressed child from the crowd. Security had spent at least 15 minutes before he took the stage pulling crying children over the fence to safety, whilst commendably providing umpteen cups of water from a dustbin to those youngsters who had spent the interval awaiting his appearance, only to find themselves crushed hard against the barrier as stage time approached. The less mentally able members of the crowd took it upon themselves to throw the generously proffered drinks backwards over their heads, drenching those behind them, and wasting the potential succour that fresh water could have given those who were unprepared for the demands of such a populous event.

At all times the conduct of the security staff remained beyond reproach – they rescued all who were in need, and provided refreshment and comfort to those who decided they were prepared to remain and brave the onslaught. What remains questionable is the target demographic of the event itself. Live music events with large numbers of attendees are usually an adult affair. Allowing 14-year-olds to attend alone, guarantees that substantial numbers within the crowd are emotionally and physically unprepared for the climax of such a busy event. Imagine grown adults being hoisted desperately crying from the barrier of the pyramid stage at Glastonbury, just as the headline act is about to appear – it simply doesn’t happen.

The most drunken and incapable members of the crowd were the youngest. Who on Earth consents to their teenage daughter leaving the house in her underwear with only a bottle of vodka for company is beyond me. Whoever they are, they should read this and hang their heads in shame, for they have knowingly exposed their children to grave risk of injury and distress. In future, this event may consider requiring under-18s to be chaperoned into the main arena. Since the dance-orientated Ballast Hills venue was full from early afternoon, your correspondent cannot comment on conditions there. It may be that that venue was more appropriate for those of a more inexperienced and excitable temperament, being a wide, grassy space, rather than a long, narrow, fenced car park.

All that said, there were some fine musical performances. Miles Kane proved that if the promoters cannot afford the services of Paul Weller or Arctic Monkeys, he can act as a reasonably adequate substitute. His plum tailored suit was a particular highlight.

Maximo Park delivered a set greater than their tenuous grasp on relevance; Paul Smith remains an excellent frontman, despite his band lacking a killer dynamic. Newly-unveiled album title track ‘The National Health’ was a particular highlight. But it falls to Dog is Dead to be the unlikely winner from a very peculiar day of music. Their easygoing jangly guitar pop didn’t harm anyone, nor did it cause a crush, and perfectly served the clearing clouds. And damned with such faint praise is the first of the two days of Newcastle Evolution Festival 2012.



Martin’s musing of day 2 at Evolution will be posted early next week!

 

Miles Kane / October 2011 English Tour

 
By on Monday, 23rd May 2011 at 9:00 am
 

Miles Kane will be playing a handful of dates in England this October. Tickets are on sale now.

Tuesday 18th October 2011 – Birmingham Library at HMV Institute
Thursday 20th October 2011 – Liverpool O2 Academy
Saturday 22nd October 2011 – Manchester HMV Ritz
Tuesday 25th October 2011 – London Electric Ballroom

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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