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WIN / Weekend festival and camping tickets to Beat-Herder Festival 2017

 
By on Tuesday, 11th April 2017 at 11:00 am
 

It may be only April, but soon enough Beat-Herder 2017 will be upon us. For a third year running, TGTF have blagged a pair of weekend camping and parking tickets for a lucky TGTF reader and a guest to attend the event in July. It’s bound to be another 3 great days and nights in the Ribble Valley, and we’re so chuffed we can gift a pair of tickets to this fabulous event to a lucky winner. The value of this prize is an an incredible £303 before handling fees if you were to buy them today. Read on to learn more about Beat-Herder and how to enter our contest!

Beat-Herder Festival is an annual summer festival in the Ribble Valley, Sawley, Lancashire, and it’s always a good shout. In its 12th year in 2017, they’ve already released a star-studded bill that will only get better as we get closer to the event and the days get warmer. So far, Birmingham’s irrepressible Sleaford Mods (in a Northern England festival exclusive) and Danish electronic producer Trentmoller have been announced to performer on the main Beat-Herder stage on Saturday night, with reggae giants Toots and the Maytals to appear on Sunday night.

The Toil Trees stage, “the beating heart of the festival”, will host a great selection of famed acts in electronic and dance, including Jon Hopkins and and Skream doing DJ sets plus Mr Scruff. Other notable names scheduled to appear at Beat-Herder this year include American hip-hop pioneers The Sugarhill Gang plus Melle Mel and Scorpio, Lee “Scratch” Perry adding to the festival’s reggae theme of past years, Dub Pistols and Factory Floor. There’s loads more names listed on the lineup as of today to whet your musical appetite, check them all out through here.

How do you enter? I’m glad you asked. First, give us your full name and email address. We’ll need both to contact you if you win. Second, tell us which act on the line-up you’re most excited to see at Beat-Herder this summer, and why. (We’d like to be sure you’re keen enough on coming along.) I’ll read through all the entries and choose the best one. Third, please provide your Twitter handle, as you’ll need to be a follower of TGTF there to qualify for the contest. Easy peasy.

Be sure to get your entry in to us before noon BST Friday 14 April, when the contest closes. I will contact the winner by email shortly after. Be sure to check your email, as the winner will need to confirm his/her availability to attend. Good luck to everyone!

This contest is now closed. The winner will be contacted by email soon.

 

Video of the Moment #2315: Sleaford Mods

 
By on Tuesday, 7th March 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

Sleaford Mods – Jason Williamson (words, often of a political bent) and Andrew Fearn (music) – released their newest album on Friday. ‘English Tapas’, the follow-up to 2015s ‘Key Markets’, is out now on Rough Trade Records. The latest video from the Nottingham post-punk and social consciousness duo is for album track ‘Moptop’. It was directed by their frequent collaborator Simon Parfrement and filmed in a friend’s kitchen. ‘Moptop’, like ‘T.C.R.’ before it, is a catchy tune of the highest calibre, which is pretty cool considering it’s about a particularly polarising figure in Britain’s recent history. Williamson says the song is “based around the disgusting lie that is Boris Johnson, the wannabe Churchill (We don’t need another one). The song also discusses the void that is modern music, internet attention spans, one dimensional acts and the current trend of reformed bands looking to cash in with PR heavy assaults that try to conceal their pointlessness.” Watch the video and its small, yet effective strobe light below. To read more about Sleaford Mods on TGTF, use this link.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/BtMs-_VEeyE[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #2181: Sleaford Mods

 
By on Friday, 9th September 2016 at 6:00 pm
 

Sleaford Mods don’t mind telling it like it is. It’s clearly working: Iggy Pop named them “undoubtedly, absolutely, definitely the world’s greatest rock n roll band”. The Nottingham duo comprises the lyrical genius of Jason Williamson set to Andrew Fearn’s music, and they’re gearing up for a new release next month. The five-track ‘T.C.R.’ EP will be out on the 14th of October on Rough Trade Records, with whom the pair signed to earlier this year. ‘T.C.R.’ stands for total control racing, which Williamson uses as an analogy to a dead-end life with great effect. He explains the song and its new accompanying video:

The idea behind the T.C.R. video was to show and use the actual 1980’s toy racing kit in its original environment, which would of most probably been the living room floor for most kids at that time. It’s a pretty crap device, and I thought it married perfectly to the idea of life’s (at times) rotating dross. The narration/vocal over the song is just that, an account of a bloke reacting to what he feels is a routine laden existence by ‘escaping’ for the night to the pub only to realize this is also a limited experience and in turn, all options kind of merge into a circular experience of never ending repetition that he tries to navigate.

The epitome of a simple DIY video that does what it says on the tin, you can watch the promo video for ‘T.C.R.’ below. For more of TGTF’s coverage on Sleaford Mods, go here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KT2mLi7ldew[/youtube]

 

Liverpool Sound City 2016 Roundup

 
By on Monday, 13th June 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

Liverpool is a city drenched in musical history and culture. If you weren’t aware of this by now, maybe check out The Beatles. They’re pretty good. So obviously it makes perfect sense to host a music festival here. Rather than find a large park or field to hold said festival, the creators of Sound City have decided to utilise the plethora of empty and abandoned dock yards, which by all accounts is a stroke of genius. It gives it a unique environment that other festivals just can’t. By having the festival on such an exposed setting you are potentially setting yourself up for failure with the weather, especially in the North West of England. However, this year at Sound City, the sun was in full attendance for the weekend.

The first day was a veritable festival of the unknown and known. As much of an oxymoron as that sounds, Sound City 2016’s lineup was clearly meant to bring fans of the larger bands – who made up only a small percentage of the total bill – and expose them to local acts and those from further afield. Walking around the docklands, you were invited into a number of tents and stages. Considering the size of the land which this event takes place on, it isn’t hard to imagine that such a situation could be mildly overwhelming. Sound bleed was also an issue, particularly amongst the smaller stages. Of course, when you have such a small amount of real estate to play with this is also expected. But it is rather awkward in the grand scheme of things.

Whilst perusing the grounds, it was the acts that actually didn’t have a stage per se who were more eye-catching. A group of musicians in the midst of a somewhat spontaneous jam session near a tent reminded you of the true meaning behind festivals such as Sound City. It’s to enjoy the moment and capture whatever arises, be it a sea of fans ready for a band (Saturday night’s headliners Catfish and the Bottlemen) or those just interested in fuelling each other’s minds.

The evening boasted a strong lineup: as mentioned previously, each band would draw roughly the same crowd, giving the main stage an extra thick layer of hangers-on and day-waiters. When Band of Skulls took to the stage, the sun was blindingly beautiful, and the heat had done its job of giving a party-filled and relaxed atmosphere. Well that, coupled with the abundance of alcohol. Cracking through a selection of hits, both old and new, they created a wall of movement that really kicked the evening off. Personally, I think Band of Skulls have the potential of being headliners, though with Catfish’s current trajectory, putting the Southampton rockers on well before them was hardly surprising.

Brum’s Sleaford Mods took to the stage next with as much anger and angst as you can imagine, further feeding the frenzy. Finally, it was time for the much-anticipated set from Llandudno-born Catfish and The Bottlemen. The instantaneous reaction that happened with the first notes was one of severe chaos and revelry. Bottles of questionable liquid flew through the air and refused to hit the ground until the last notes rang out. The set itself was a roaring success, but the abundance of their fans at the festival – this, once again, isn’t a negative toward the band – within its small boundaries, didn’t leave much room for the usual conglomeration of music fans and artists alike. A strange feeling for what is meant to be a music industry showcase at the end of the day.

The second day of the festival had more promise, though it had its own trials to face of a different matter. Another blistering day meant that the atmosphere was once again joyous, but the diversity in the headliners brought a more eclectic mixture of personalities to the crowd, giving Sound City on Sunday a much more traditional festival appearance in terms of punters. With pretty much more of the same during the day – a stream of throbbing crowds, a collection of sounds melding in the air and unknown music fun – it was proof that the foundations of Sound City were set in this formulaic way.

Security throughout the event were definitely earning their paycheck, though in some aspects they were overly prominent in the wrong areas, which had a mildly negative effect on the more inebriated revellers, shall we say. This is always a touchy subject: generally, if a drunk person is annoyed or angered, the situation worsens in a lot of aspects. There was nothing too untoward at the festival, but security’s handling of situations could’ve been a bit less rash. Anyway, back to the music.

The Dandy Warhols brought their late ‘90s sound to the joyous crowd, with the biggest reaction, predictably, for their smash hit ‘Bohemian Like You’. Their sound was perfect for the afternoon, being one that is drenched in memories of past years, while also being able to appeal to a fresh audience. Local lads Circa Waves brought this to the next level by giving a performance that fully engaged the audience, while ensuring that the level they’ve reached as a band is maintained through a consistent and heavy barrage of tracks that just garner in strength. Circa Waves are a force that just won’t let up, and this force just fed the crowd into a frenzy. Bear in mind this is a crowd mostly consisting of Liverpudlians, awaiting their hometown heroes’ comeback show.

And this is where The Coral (pictured at top) come in to play. With a set that was interrupted by a power cut across the entire festival, the Coral’s time onstage never really managed to take off as it had for the bands before them. There was still a certain magic to the set, but with an interruption that was out of the hands of the band onstage, it’s a hard thing to come back from. Obvious hit ‘Dreaming Of You’ punched the set back into life, but by this point it was too late and the end was nigh. Considering this was a hometown show, the set felt flat. The result? It felt like there was no recognition of the moment’s massive occasion that was clearly a draw for so many within the crowd.

Sound City is a complex little beast. Its purpose is to draw in professionals and punters alike, almost in a The Great Escape manner. But somehow this year’s atmosphere felt confused. It wasn’t sure where it sat, which ultimately left a peculiar feeling in the air. Hopefully next year’s festival builds upon this year positively and comes back stronger than ever. The foundations are certainly there, and since the waters of Liverpool don’t see the sights they once used to, the reuse of the abandoned docks is certainly a fantastic idea.

 

Video of the Moment #1940: Sleaford Mods

 
By on Monday, 26th October 2015 at 6:00 pm
 

Header photo by Duncan Stafford

Nottingham post-punk and social consciousness duo Sleaford Mods – Jason Williamson (words) and Andrew Fearn (music) – released their latest album ‘Key Markets’ this past summer, named as one of the egregiously missing albums from the recently revealed 2015 Mercury Prize nominees list. However you feel about their lack of inclusion for a gong next month, the pair have a new promo video out this week for their upcoming single ‘Single Me’. I’ll leave it to Williamson to describe the song:

“‘Silly Me is about the long tunnel, the one that has no light. Another week spent walking up and down the street. The quiet tension of your living room with its shit sofa. The unconfirmed nature of ‘doing’ instead of ‘trying’.

It’s that realisation that all you have to work with is your own failure, it’s the only starting point you have and to ignore it, to dismiss the reasons why unhappiness is still haunting you is a mistake. It’s your ticket out of misery if you keep trying to confront it because eventually persistence rules. Not all the time though.

This isn’t one of those fucking smug acid jazz positivity yawns. Large numbers of people have fuck all and that won’t change. That’s horrible. ‘Silly Me’ is just one experience over Andrew’s solid, hard funk loop.”

Watch the video, which includes moments from their recent sold out and fairly priced for the people ‘Key Markets’ tour campaign. ‘Silly Me’ will be out on the 27th of November on Harbinger Sound, and ‘Key Markets’ is available now.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e44_LQ-n0ls[/youtube]

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

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