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TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: this year’s conference programming on Music Cities

 
By on Thursday, 9th March 2017 at 3:00 pm
 

The idea of developing so-called “music cities” became popular in the music industry following Sound Diplomacy Music Cities Conventions in Brighton and Washington, DC in 2015. Our own editor Mary attended the Music Cities Convention in DC that year and was impressed by the breadth of expertise among the convention attendees, as well as their universal dedication to keeping music alive and well at the community level.

Though Austin certainly already fits the definition of a music city, the SXSW Music Conference picked up on the idea in 2016 with a pair of conference sessions, ‘How To Build A Music City’ and ‘Why Every Music City Should Have A Night Mayor’ specifically geared toward further development of music cities in America. The sessions examined the roles and interactions between “musicians, entrepreneurs, and innovators” and city government representatives in encouraging curation and maintenance of vibrant local music scenes.

PARTYBABY at SXSW 2016

This year’s SXSW Music Conference takes the music cities concept a step or two farther, expanding its offerings on the subject to build upon the foundation laid in last year’s sessions. Two main sessions in the Music Industry track focus directly on building music cities, while a number of other sessions deal with peripherally related topics relevant to supporting music within a city’s infrastructure.

On Thursday the 16th of March, leaders from established music cities will present ‘How To Build A Music City – The Launch’. Their aim is to follow last year’s discussions regarding advocacy and resource management with advice on specific planning processes for building successful music programs and fostering thriving local music communities.

The next day, Friday the 17th of March, expands the music cities concept to a broader global vision, taking on the idea of a vast, worldwide ‘Music Cities Network’. According to the official Conference schedule, “This session will talk necessities, goals, agenda and benefits of a global music cities network. It will focus on knowledge exchange and policy, city development and city marketing.”

JoJo Abot at SXSW 2016

Also in the Music Industry Track are a handful of sessions focused on more specific aspects of local music culture. On the 15th of March, ‘New Nashville: The Evolution of Music Publishing’ will look to Nashville as an established music city to “give examples of current and past ideas that have shaped the industry; what’s working, what’s not working, and what does the future hold?” A condensed Talk 20 session on that same day titled ‘Music Industry Development for Diverse Communities’ will tackle questions such as “How well do we do at supporting and representing the full spectrum of diversity in our communities?” and “How do we balance championing the artists best positioned to have success in the market with the full diversity of the region we represent?” An even more specialised session on the 17th of March called ‘I Remember That Band: Preserving Local Music’ talks about how local music archives get started, how they impact the music scene, and what kinds of information they can provide about their local communities.

More peripherally, the Touring & Live Experience Track features several panel sessions relevant to music culture in smaller cities. ‘How to Sell Your Event to a City’, on the 15th of March, encourages formation of “positive, mutually beneficial, and long lasting relationships with the host cities and their respective tourism boards and local government, by concentrating on increased local economic growth”. Music festivals, specifically, are addressed under topics such as ‘Rethinking the Future of Music Festivals’ (17th March), ‘Families at Music Festivals’ (16th March), and ‘The Definitive Profile of the Festival Superfan’ (16th March), while community-level events in smaller spaces are discussed in ‘Intimate Spaces: Programming Small Venues’ (16th March) and ‘Saving Small Venues & The Independent Music Scene’ (18th March).

The Spook School at SXSW 2016

With their 2017 programming, the SXSW Music Conference is getting behind Sound Diplomacy and the Music Cities Convention’s overarching goals of “improving urban planning, quality of life, city policy and development strategies through music” and exploring “the role and impact of music across education, employment, community building, placemaking, licensing and regulation.” And after 30 years of playing host to SXSW, what better city is there to illustrate the challenges and successes of cultivating a local music scene than Austin itself?

As always, the SXSW Music conference schedule is subject to change; for complete, updated information on Music Conference tracks at SXSW 2017, consult the official SXSW schedule here.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: Feminism at this year’s festival’s forefront

 
By on Wednesday, 8th March 2017 at 3:00 pm
 

Header photo: SXSW 2017 featured conference speaker Nadya Tolokonnikova

Those of you who are regular readers of TGTF, or who faithfully follow our SXSW music festival coverage, will have read our SXSW 2016 article on feminism ahead of last year’s event. Event organisers took a decidedly feminist stance in their planning last year, scheduling both a wide range of feminist conference speakers and an impressive list of female artists on the music showcases. This year’s overview of feminism at SXSW will focus on the music conference, which once again offers an array of feminist-oriented events, including full-length panel discussions, professional meet-ups, and interactive sessions with notable female artists.

Non-profit education and service organisation Women in Music will host a ‘Women in Music Meet Up’ session on Wednesday the 15th of March, providing a place and time to gather people “from across all areas of the music industry who support empowerment, equality, and opportunities for women in music”. The meet up will also offer “an opportunity to learn more about the non-profit organization Women in Music and its community”. Later in the week, on Saturday the 18th of March, members of Women in Music will participate in a full panel session titled ‘Passport to Women in Music: A Global Review’ designed to “explore the similarities and differences in the challenges women face around the world and analyze the ways that men and women are collaborating together to solve these challenges”.

Professional topics within the music industry will be addressed in panel discussions such as ‘A League of Their Own: Success as a Female Entrepreneur’ on the 16th of March, where four female speakers from different specialties within the music industry will talk about “where they are today and what hurdles they faced” to get there. On a more specific subject, another quartet of panelists will tackle issues surrounding “one of the most competitive roles in music” with ‘Women in A&R: Navigating the Stereotypes’ on Friday the 17th of March.

From a performance-related perspective, ‘Safe Space to Rock: Combating Harassment in Music’ on the 17th of March, will comprise a panel of five speakers, including Speedy Ortiz frontwoman Sadie Dupuis, who has appeared at SXSW previously as a showcasing artist and a featured conference speaker, and members of  queer-punk band PWR BTTM, who are scheduled to showcase at this year’s music festival. The session proposes to confront “problems of harassment in the music scene and propose solutions to ensure the music community is a safe, accessible space for people of all genders and sexual orientations”.

Cindy Wilson press photo

(photo credit: Jeremy Ayers and Keith Bennett)

More in-depth artist perspectives on feminism will be provided by a pair of single-speaker sessions with notable female artists. On the 16th of March, a session with Russian conceptual artist and political activist Nadya Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot will focus on the interrelation of art and activism in her career. The following day, a conversation with singer/songwriter Cindy Wilson (pictured above) of New Wave band The B-52s, will focus on the new musical direction she has taken with recent solo album ‘Change’.

Finally, the music fan viewpoint will be represented in a meta-analytical conference session titled ‘What Young Women Want From Music Festivals’ on the 16th of March. Operating on the premise that “thanks to increased buying power and interest, . . .18-24-year-old women are among the most formative forces behind the evolving music festival landscape”, this four-member panel discussion centers on the implications of growing participation from this demographic group for event producers, festival sponsors and performing artists.

As always, the schedule of events at SXSW 2017 is subject to change. For the most up-to-date information about the entire festival, including the music conference and the lineup of showcasing artists, you can consult the official schedule here. TGTF’s ongoing preview coverage of SXSW 2017 is collected here.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: this year’s Music keynotes and recommended speakers

 
By on Tuesday, 7th March 2017 at 3:00 pm
 

Every year, SXSW has the good fortune to be able to draw incredible speakers involved in tech, film, and of course what we’re interested in, music. This year is no exception. So I’ll be highlighting who I consider the can’t miss recommended speakers of the Music stream of SXSW 2017.

Darryl “DMC” McDaniels (Thursday 17 March, 12:30 PM) – Utter his name and those beats from Run DMC’s version of ‘Walk This Way’ come into your head, don’t they? The thing that fascinates me about people like McDaniels is that you know they could retire on the royalties from songs and projects from so long ago. So why do they keep at it? It’s the passion. McDaniels has another passion besides music, comic books, which he parlayed into a comic book company back in 2014. He’s also a published writer two times over. Certainly a man with a lot to say and considering the current political climate, I am sure he has an opinion on what is going in our country today. Darryl “DMC” McDaniels is a legendary music icon who first impacted the world over 30 years ago. From the first rap group to grace the cover of Rolling Stone to the first to appear on MTV, Grammy nominated Run-DMC changed music, culture, fashion, language and made American history. It would be hard to overstate his influence on popular culture.”

Krist Novoselic (Tuesday 14 March, 3:30 PM) – After Kurt Cobain’s untimely death, history could have been written such that the surviving two members of Nirvana never could overcome the late Cobain’s shadow. We all know what Dave Grohl went on to, but did you know that bassist Krist Novoselic went on to making politics a high priority in his life? From SXSW: “A member of the groundbreaking rock band Nirvana, Krist Novoselic and his bandmates changed the course of music history with their much-acclaimed album Nevermind. Novoselic went on to become one of rock’s most politically-minded musicians and an influential part of the Northwest political scene. He serves as Board chair for FairVote, a non-profit that seeks to make democracy fair.”

Mick Fleetwood (Wednesday 15 March, 5 PM) – His surname is half of the name of one of the greatest rock bands to have come out of the Seventies, so Mick Fleetwood’s place in the history of rock ‘n’ roll is assured. However, music is not the only thing Fleetwood has dabbled in. He owns a highly successful restaurant and bar in his current locale of Maui, Hawaii, and will be trying his hand at writing a chronicle on the band that made him famous. “Mick Fleetwood is a self-taught drummer and a founding member of one of the most successful bands of the last fifty years, Fleetwood Mac. Formed in 1967, their first album Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac came in at no.4 in the UK charts and brought the band overnight success. They went on to release the no.1 hit “Albatross” and a series of critically acclaimed albums, with further hit singles including “Black Magic Woman” and “Need Your Love So Bad.”

Nile Rodgers (Keynote / Wednesday 15 March at 11 AM / pictured at top) – Suffice to say, there are few people who have as many credits to their name, are as well-respected and are still in demand for collaboration and for so many decades as Nile Rodgers. While he’s probably best known as the co-founder and guitarist of disco trailblazers Chic, he’s responsible for countless hits that benefitted from his golden production touch. For myself, my life would never have been the same if he hadn’t been drafted in as a co-producer of Duran Duran’s ‘Notorious’ album. Rodgers is the epitome of cool and a living legend. As much as I’d like to be there for his keynote, to hear the stories he has to share from his many years in the business, something tells me it’s going to be rammed. From SXSW: “Among music legends, Nile Rodgers is truly exceptional. He amplifies his legacy as a multiple Grammy Award-winning composer, producer, arranger, and guitarist. As a cultural icon and music innovator with more than 200 production credits to his name, Nile Rodgers transcends all styles of music across every generation.”

Rachael Ray (Friday 17 March, 12:30 PM) – Her name probably sounds funny on a music speakers list like this, but having watched her cooking shows over the years, sister’s got a good taste in music and loves it. The now national network personality has hosted her own – and mind you, free – curated day of bands in Austin for the last 9 years of SXSW and as an unusual entry among the other Music Influencers, I’d venture to say this could be the most interesting Music Influencers session of them all. From SXSW: “Television host, bestselling author and Austin enthusiast, Rachael Ray, has hosted two annual Feedback food and music events in Austin during SXSW for the last nine years which have played host to the likes of The Districts, J. Roddy Walston & The Business, Shovels & Rope, JEFF The Brotherhood, Blondie, Raekwon and over 150 other acts.”

Zane Lowe (Keynote / Thursday 16 March at 11 AM) – I was never a fan of Zane’s shouty delivery style when he was still the primetime evening presenter on BBC Radio 1 a few years ago. However you feel about him and the music he chooses to tip, it’s undeniable that he is well-respected in the global music community, his finger now on the pulse of things well beyond merely Britain as Creative Director of Beats 1. From SXSW: “Zane’s wealth of music knowledge and creative vision bring personality back to the modern age of music discovery through the human experience. With free-form, cutting-edge programming built purely on taste and passion, Lowe creates a united way for the world to talk about music in a free space. The objective is clear: to break records, to find new music, and to put exciting new artists in front of an audience that wants to hear it.”

As always, the schedule of events at SXSW 2017 is subject to change. For the most up-to-date information about the entire festival, including the music conference and the lineup of showcasing artists, you can consult the official schedule here. TGTF’s ongoing preview coverage of SXSW 2017 is collected here.

 

SXSW 2016 Music and Tech: Tipcow

 
By on Thursday, 7th April 2016 at 11:00 am
 

One of the perks of being a SXSW 2016 Music conference attendee is access to the SXSW Trade Show. It was my first year to partake in the event taking place during Convergence, the period of the festival when the Film, Interactive and Music parts run concurrently. While I didn’t have as much time as I would have liked to stop at all the interesting booths in the Austin Convention Center on Monday and Tuesday, there were a few booths in particular that impressed me with their innovation and creativity. I hope as time goes on, I’ll be able to connect you with some of the fine folks of these companies and organisations in the near future.

First up, I want to introduce you to a local to Austin startup who have sussed out a way for artists to get a compliment, via the ever-important medium of money, directly from the fans. We had a great conversation about a recent move by a cafe in Philadelphia to allow music fans seeing live music there to include a tip to the artist playing on their drink bill. Co-founder of TipCow Rene De La Mora rightly pointed out the inherent problem in this idea: punters then will either shortchange the venue for their food and drink in favour of giving more of their money to the band, or vice versa. TipCow is different, as it’s a free service for artists to connect with their fans and to get paid (or in this case, tipped) for their hard work and efforts in their art, and without a middleman, maximising payments from fan to artist. I asked CEO Chris Bush in his own words explain how their app, now available in the Apple Store and Google Play, works:

TipCow screencap

TipCow is a mobile app and Web service to allow fans to tip their favorite artists. Each artist has a social media profile through our service with a unique URL, allowing direct fan to artist support any time, and for any reason. This URL can be shared on artists’ social media profiles, Web sites, or other online platforms to allow them to receive tips from fans outside of their shows. Artists also have a dashboard to track their tip amounts and locations, so they can make smarter booking decisions based on which venues they see the most support. We also have a very secure, yet simple signup process to guarantee the artists that can be found in the apps are who they say they are.

We directly promote and support artists via http://www.tipcow.live and our social media reach. We have professional photographers on staff to review shows, and work directly with artists to increase their tips at these shows. We also have a tip incentive redemption program in place for select shows to incentivize tipping. We partner with neighboring businesses and venues to give discounts on agreed upon items for tippers, like drink or food discounts. We are currently working on technical features to bring these incentives and many others into the app to bring as much revenue to artists as we possibly can.

Artists currently sign up on the Web site at tipcow.me, and fans can sign up via the app or on the Web site as well.”

We here at TGTF are definitely for any new technology that can increase deserved artists’ incomes and keep them firmly in their livelihoods. More than ever, artists need all the help they can get to keep making music for fans like you and me and all over the world, and this app provides a seamless app to let us help them directly. We’ll definitely be keeping our eye on TipCow and their future innovations in the coming months.

 

SXSW 2016: highlights from this year’s Music Conference programming – The Obamas, Tony Visconti, Richie Hawtin and the latest in song syncs

 
By on Monday, 28th March 2016 at 4:00 pm
 

2016 marked the 30th anniversary of SXSW and with reaching such a milestone, it just wouldn’t be right to not celebrate with appearances by some heavy hitters, right? And the Austin festival managed a one-two punch in his music conference programming by securing not only First Lady Michelle Obama but the President of the United States Barack Obama as well. The President delivered the keynote address during SXSW Interactive on Friday. Watch below as he discusses the importance of civic engagement and his support for new technologies.

SXSW Music Conference attendees did not miss out at all, as the First Lady graced the conference with her presence Wednesday, bringing along fellow influential ladies Missy Elliott and Queen Latifah, known as female pioneers of hip hop, and Diane Warren, famed for penning some of pop’s greatest hits in the history of popular music. The three of them were in Austin to promote the Let Girls Learn initiative, which will no doubt be one of Mrs. Obama’s enduring legacies long after she and her husband have left the White House. In the short clip below, she speaks on how she finds young people inspirational and disappoints a good many present in the room with her announcement that she won’t be running for public office in favour of taking care of her and Barack’s two young daughters.

The Obamas’ separate appearances to speak at SXSW 2016 caused considerable headache to both event staff and conference attendees alike. The understandable security around the First Lady created additional problems, delaying sessions and bringing frustration to people like me who like to keep to a schedule. Not aware that legendary producer Tony Visconti‘s keynote had been moved from Wednesday to Thursday was just another thing to throw a spanner in the works.

One wonders what was going in Visconti’s mind when he received the news that his speech would be delayed by a day due to a more famous, more important VIP. I also had to wonder if his selection was coincidental or done on purpose as a memoriam of sorts for the late David Bowie, with whom Visconti collaborated on and off with for nearly 5 decades. Knowing his audience well, he quipped early on that he’d be speaking about how he met Bowie soon enough, and he did. (Similarly witty stories were shared by Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo in another session Thursday afternoon, telling stories about Bowie and Iggy Pop that can’t be reprinted in a family-friendly publication. Mothersbaugh was in town during an exhibition of his art at the Contemporary.) Biographies in print are great of course, but for me, nothing can replace personal, first-hand anecdotes from the people that were there. That’s what makes interviews great for me, to truly be let into another creative’s world, to be let into the little secrets, and part of the fun is doing the research and trying to fit together someone’s pieces before you actually get to the interview and then let your interviewee go off in whatever director he or she wishes.

Hearing Visconti speak, in such a humourous, personable way, it makes total sense how he’s become such a famous producer and been confided in by not just Bowie (being one of the few dear people in his circle aware of his impending departure) but the late glam rock star Marc Bolan and someone as crotchety as Morrissey. Visconti is the kind of guy you wish you could knock a few beers back with because he’d make you feel at ease, but is ever so talented at what he can do in a recording studio, to be able to pull out the best from whoever he works with. And if that wasn’t enough, he is also a writer, sharing with the audience bits from his upcoming book The Universe, that paints a bleak picture of what music will be like in the future.

We can laugh but there’s also a sense of sad acceptance that the signs, the klaxons of warning in our industry have already rung out. “Your product is culture”, Visconti said in a matter-of-fact way, and he believes that boutique labels and self-releasing is a good but not great solution to the lack of support for true visionary artists. He, like us here at TGTF, want to see more quality in music and he gave a great example of going to the grocery store and having variety the kind of ketchup or bacon you want to buy. There isn’t one choice and there shouldn’t one choice in music in all the manufactured top 40 we’re hearing these days, either. Watch Visconti’s keynote in full below.

At a session for Convergence late Tuesday night, Canadian DJ vanguard Richie Hawtin spoke with Resident Advisor‘s North American editor Andrew Ryce (pictured at top) about his new performance mixer Play Differently, which has been a project he’s worked on for 2 years with Allen & Heath and Audiotonix. What I found most interesting about Hawtin’s responses – in additional to his clearly unwavering passion for DJaying and electronics – is that he’s not all about chasing the next big thing in electronic music.

You’d expect someone like him who’s into making the best sounds possible onstage to embrace every digital technology known to man, and indeed, he made everyone laugh when he air-manipulated an imaginary device he noted as “this is my girlfriend”. So it surprised me when said that he didn’t necessarily agree with digital DJaying as being the be all and end all, saying, “there shouldn’t be a formula to make music and play it…Follow who you are, and make the music *you* want to make.” In that respect, I felt this view of Hawtin’s echoed Tony Visconti said about tapping into culture and talent and going beyond just mere technology. It gives me great hope personally that these titans of the industry still believe that even in spite to everything distracting and potentially detrimental to our business, the cream should and will always rise to the top. Have a watch of Hawtin’s Q&A with Ryce below.

A topic that has been of interest to me for a long time is the business of song syncs and how one goes from a composer who writes specifically for or has already written a song for a particular commercial use to that composer and any deserving middleman earning money off of the song’s use. As record sales have dwindled in the face of music piracy, song syncing is no longer looked upon as the selling out it once did. And in many cases these days, such syncs have enabled artists to continue working where they might have otherwise run out of money.

Among the many panels on the subject of syncs in this year’s music conference programming, there were two in particular that caught my eye. In the session Creating Custom Songs for Film, TV, Trailers & Ads on Thursday, the emphasis was on the composer side, with the panelists making suggestions to the prospective songwriters in the audience on how to market and indeed, possibly direct their writing to get the best chance for a sync. It was intriguing to me that Josh Collum of Sorted Noise recommended writers to focus on songs about home and coming home, as they’re perennially needed and used across film and TV. Who knew? Meanwhile, Phillip Phillips with his 43 million YouTube views is laughing all the way to the bank…

On the other side and in more specific, the placement of songs in TV was explored Friday in the session entitled TV Promos: Sync’s New Best Friend. Going on from a similar session at Norwich Sound and Vision 2015 last October, it is mind-bogglingly amazing to me that one of the biggest recommendations to fledging artists these days to land a sync is to record good quality, unique cover versions of popular songs. The idea is that because the original song by the original artist will be too expensive and therefore out of reach or too complicated a permission for most copyright clearance offices to negotiate, a music supervisor will instead go for a cover that costs less money, and as a win for the little indie musician, the musician gets paid. Score! A specific example from Joe Berman of MediaHorse brought even more hope: a cover of an Elvis Presley song was deemed too risky, as Presley’s estate had to agree to its use even as a cover, but in a shock turn of events, Priscilla Presley herself liked the cover Berman’s client was putting forward, and it’s now being used in an advert for The Bachelor and for Trojan condoms. So you see, dreams can and do come true…

I look forward to seeing what keynotes and panels are in store for us in the 31st year of SXSW Music. I wish to thank Elizabeth and her team at SXSW Music Press for granting me a badge for the purposes of covering both the conference and music showcases this year in 2016.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: a further roundup of our conference and festival coverage to date

 
By on Monday, 14th March 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

Whilst being stuck on a plane (not moving, then moving) for way too many hours on Saturday, I had a lot of time to think. And I thought, hmm, maybe some of you out there might be true procrastinators, not having paid attention to any of the programming on top for SXSW 2016, whether it be the conference panels, the music showcases, or both. For those of you waiting until the last possible minute to firm up your schedules or maybe you’re the type who likes to fly by the seat of your pants (trousers?), this post summarises everything SXSW 2016 we’ve posted since my last roundup of articles on the 22nd of February, which you can view here.

Follow us on Twitter at @tgtf and individually on @theprintedword (me, Mary) and @VocalicPage (Carrie) for more live updates from Austin as they happen. Use this link to access all of our SXSW 2016 content, including post-event coverage.

longhorn in our back garden, SXSW 2016

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016 overview posts on the conference (an additional 5):

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: how-tos for the artists, and how to deal with brands and data (Music Conference panel overview, part 1 of 4)

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: music discovery and delivery, genres and eras, and international issues (Music Conference panel overview, part 2 of 4)

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Feminism at this year’s festival’s forefront

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: syncing and publishing, experiencing music live, and fan engagement (Music Conference panel overview, part 3 of 4)

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: new tech and the war on format, journalism and PR, and royalties and copyright (Music Conference panel overview, part 4 of 4)

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016 overview posts on the British Music Embassy showcases and a focus on regional acts (an additional 5):

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Huw Stephens with PRS for Music and British Music @ SXSW at the British Music Embassy – 15th-16th March 2016

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Output Belfast, and PIAS in association with AIM at the British Music Embassy – 17th March 2016

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Welsh artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Scottish artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Artists from Ireland and Northern Ireland showcasing at this year’s SXSW

Bands to Watch previews of SXSW 2016 showcasing artists (an additional 5 acts profiled):

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #382: The Sherlocks

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #383: Autobahn

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #384 and #385: Jane Weaver and Holly Macve

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #386: Frances

Album Reviews Featuring SXSW 2016 Artists (an additional 4):

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Album Review: Brian Fallon – Painkillers

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Album Review: Lissie – My Wild West

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Album Review: The Dunwells – Light Up the Sky (Update: The Dunwells have since announced they won’t be showcasing at this year’s SXSW.)

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Album Review: Roo Panes – Paperweights

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Quickfire Questions (10)

Quickfire Questions #97: Pat Hynes of Holy Esque

Quickfire Questions #98: Tommy O’Dell of DMA’s

Quickfire Questions #99: Banners

Quickfire Questions #100: Noemi of Abjects

Quickfire Questions #101: Violet Skies

Quickfire Questions #102: Tyla Campbell of The People The Poet

Quickfire Questions #103: Gwenno

Quickfire Questions #104: Avec Sans

Quickfire Questions #105: Oscar

Quickfire Questions #106: Oli Burslem of YAK

Miscellaneous Features Starring SXSW 2016 Artists (an additional 3):

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2024: Oscar

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2025: Holy Esque

(Charity and SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2032: Lissie

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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