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TGTF X BIGSOUND 2017 Playlist: Focus on Showcasing Brisbane Bands

 
By on Thursday, 17th August 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Ahead of my first time at BIGSOUND, I thought it would be a nice gesture to celebrate the city that hosts this fabulous event every year. And what better way is there to pay it forward, then, to shine a light on the artists who call the Queensland capital home?

You might be asking yourself what kind of great music is coming out of down under. Queensland, in the northwestern part of Australia, has been the birthplace of quite a few bands you’ve heard of but perhaps might not have known have come from there. The Go-Betweens and Violent Soho (rock) and Savage Garden and The Veronicas (pop), ring any bells? Going off just those four names, it’s no surprise that there will be strong representatives in both these genres from the Sunshine State.

Sloan Peterson has already caught the eyes and ears of bloggers this side of the Pacific with her in-your-face single ‘Rats’. If you’re interested in shoegazey, slacker rock, Good Boy are your band. I wouldn’t be surprised if they got signed to Heavenly Records at some point soon. SXSW alums The Creases offer up more straightforward rock, but in a bombastic style. In the mood for something for something harder that will make your heartbeat race and make you lift your fists? Check out Driven Fear, The Comfort (male-fronted) and WAAX (female-fronted). Or maybe you want something that’s a little bit different. If so, the funk of Osaka Punch or the WTF-ery of WHALEHOUSE might be more your bag.

As we all know (and some of us lament at times), pop and r&b these days are pretty much intertwined. Depending on who you talk to, this is owing to the rise is popularity of hip-hop. Close your eyes, and the minimalist r&b vibe of Isabel sounds awfully like Lorde. Girl duo OKBADLANDS have perfected a nice blend of pop and soul, demonstrated nicely in new single ‘Mineral’. Aurelia and Miss Blanks are up-and-coming solo artists, the former embracing a more pop backing with an ephemeral vocal, while the latter serves up a more straightforward, beat-driven hip-hop sound. Originally from Fiji, Jesswar is another rapper calling Brisbane home, having already toured with the likes of Lady Leshurr and Akala.Golden Vessel is young producer Max Byrne: essentially, his music is electronic dance but with the addition of singers you’ve heard of like Woodes and now OKBADLANDS, his tracks bridge the gap between more cerebral electronic and pop.

Speaking of electronic music, Australia’s music industry has been absolutely booming in this genre. This proliferation of electronic acts out of Oz required The Aussie BBQ at SXSW 2017 this year to expand to another full afternoon of electronic-specific programming to accommodate all their artists. The soulful, synth-driven pop of Cub Sport will be delectable at BIGSOUND 2017, while the dreaminess of Yoste’s tunes will provide much needed chill. As genres continue to blur year after year, it’s not surprising to see a performer like Machine Age come to the surface. A guitarist not shy to use a “sampler and other gadgets”, he’s able to churn out electronic (‘Don’t Look’) and ‘Chivalry’ (rock) masterpieces.

Are you into more conventional guy or girl with a guitar setups? Brisbane has those too. The stripped-back, autobiographical style of Emerson Snowe puts him well in the running to becoming the happier and Aussie version of Conor Oberst. Hearing the voice of Clea, it’s unsurprising she counts Laura Marling as one of her influences. His name makes it sound like he would be feel more at home at HWCH, but Sydney transplant Paddy McHugh is an Aussie through and through. Like Frank Turner, his musical roots began in punk, but he’s now a no-holds-barred kind of singer/songwriter. Keen for a richer sound via an act with more band members? The country rock Suicide Swans will fit the bill.

Influential government-funded radio station triple j have also pledged to bring attention to up-and-coming Brisbane acts, selecting three from a pool of local talent. Carmouflage Rose (hip-hop), Holiday Party (pop) and Nice Biscuit (rock) will perform at the triple j Unearthed stage at the venue Oh Hello! The full lineups for triple j’s three nights of music are listed here on Oh Hello!’s Facebook.

Check out the playlist I put together of all these artists below. The artists mentioned in this post and included in the playlist are those who are either from or currently are based in Brisbane and appear on the first or second lists of artists scheduled to perform at BIGSOUND 2017. To read my previous preview post on BIGSOUND 2017, go here.

 

SXSW 2014: a flying visit to a New Zealand festival and doing a re-make/re-model at the British Music Embassy – 15th March 2014

 
By on Thursday, 27th March 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

When we woke up on Saturday, we were greeted by rain. Not just rain. Very heavy rain. So heavy initially that I considered going back to bed. But it was our last day in Austin and I intended to make the most of it. While it was a wee dreary walking around with an umbrella after so many days of carefree strolls in the Texan sunshine, when life hands you lemons, you have to make lemonade, am I right?

Carrie went to find coffee (if you’re reading all our posts, are you sensing a theme here?) and was to meet me later, having a leisurely early afternoon, while I went off in search of the London act I didn’t think I’d be able to see all week but somehow the organisational gods smiled down on me and suddenly I found I could. St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival is an annual music event in Auckland, New Zealand, and at this year’s SXSW, they hosted an afternoon showcase covering both stages of Holy Mountain out on 7th Street.

I arrived too early for who I was there for, so I walked between the stages to see if my ears perked up to anything I heard. In the backyard stage when I arrived were Brisbane rockers The Creases, who have that Beach Boys-ey, Best Coast-esque sunny surf pop sound nailed down all right. Not my thing at all but certainly enjoyable enough under a tent that was keeping us dry from the elements. Far more impressive to me was the guitar singer Jarrod Mahon was playing, in a shape that defies description. Maybe ‘The Preposterous Pentagon’?

After the Creases finished, I almost got impaled by one of Bo Ningen‘s guitars (that would have been awful) and quickly went back to the indoor stage to find a very tattooed, not at all huggable one man band Kirin J. Callinan, who according to this FasterLouder article was one of the big Aussie success stories of SXSW 2014. There was nothing about his performance that screamed ‘trailblazer’ to me, but I suppose for you ladies (and certain men) who enjoy a shirtless man with tattoos performing on a guitar and screaming into a microphone, you should probably get on this bandwagon ASAP.

By this time, you’re probably wondering what the heck I was doing at Holy Mountain in the first place. I’m glad you asked! Tourist, aka London musician and producer Will Phillips, was due on shortly after 1 PM. I actually saw him skulking around outside the venue beforehand. It must be really hard to psych yourself for an afternoon of DJaying when you really want to be playing your music in a dark club late at night, but Phelps took it in stride, even taking a joyful stab at the weather:

I’m not sure how best to describe the Tourist set to you. It was way too short – it seemed like less than 20 minutes – and Phillips doesn’t sing, so when you’re watching him perform, it’s him attacking a wide array of synthesisers, sequencers and other electronic gizmos, while he’s bopping his body around, clearly caught up in the music. Dance without words is hard to explain to other people, because you have to *be* there experiencing to really ‘get’ it, to have the music pulsing through your veins.

“I tried but I could not find a way
Looking back all I did was look away
Next time is the best time we all know
But if there is no next time where to go”
-‘Re-make / Re-model’, Roxy Music

Carrie and I had decided the night before that we were going finish up at the afternoon session of the British Music Embassy, where I had made plans to meet Steve Lamacq and have a meeting of the minds there (about bands of course). The very funny thing about Latitude 30 is that no matter who you know or have met during the week and is/are British, inevitably you will run into him/her/them at the venue at some point, because it’s like Latitude 30 has a beacon only Brits can hear and they are drawn in, usually multiple times during the week, to the place.

For me, going back to the British Music Embassy would bookend a mental week of seeing bands old and new as well as seeing old friends while making new ones. I didn’t want to miss the chance of saying goodbye and best wishes to any of my friends before I left Austin. We arrived in time to order a round of drinks (it was our last day, after all) and get positioned for Meursault, a trio from Edinburgh.

I had heard of Meursault and maybe two songs of theirs, so going into their performance pretty much uneducated about them, I was surprised when I was faced by their fabulous aural assault on our ears, led by singer/songwriter Neil Pennycook. You haven’t lived until you’ve heard a Scotsman be witty with his banter between songs in which where he’s practically ripping your ears off with a scream of emotion. This kind of harder rock is more John’s domain, but Meursault’s two performances on Saturday came to be defining moments of my SXSW 2014: Carrie and I were so impressed with their set, we changed our plans entirely to have an early night and swung by the Hype Hotel that night to see them again for the second time in 7 hours. I still don’t understand how another blogger could have confused their sound and called it alt-folk. That one definitely needs his (her?) ears checked. Emotionally raw vocals, raucous guitar, accompanying bass to feed the raucous sound, and driving rhythm on drums? Meursault ticks off all the boxes.

Carrie had seen Glass Animals on Tuesday at the Haven for the Harvest Records showcase Tuesday night, but I hadn’t up to that point. On paper, Glass Animals’ formula of pop and r&b with synths seemed to be right up my alley, while entirely not Carrie’s bag at all. Sadly though, I wasn’t impressed with them live. As Carrie was busy getting pregnant to ‘Black Mambo’ and ‘Gooey’, I had to wonder if my countless hours of listening to exemplary electronic music had jaded me, because their set was very much to me a “I’ve already heard that before, nothing new to see here” kind of disappointment.

Thankfully, I had the next band to look forward to, and look forward I did, as singer George Waite tuned up his bass. The Crookes, whose shows either in the UK or here in America I’ve covered on TGTF, were about to restore my sanity. It’s quite funny being in Austin with other American Crookes fans, of which there weren’t that many for SXSW 2013. However, word had clearly spread about the Sheffield band, as Latitude 30 was rammed for their 3:50 PM set.

As they played, the front section of friends new and old turned into one of the most fun dance parties I’d had in a long time, as we kicked up our heels to the infinitely rough on the edges single ‘Play Dumb’ and the driving ‘Before the Night Falls’, both of which figure on the band’s third album ‘Soapbox’ out in April on Fierce Panda. (My review of the album can be read here; it’s fantastic.) This display of unfettered dancing did not go unnoticed by Steve Lamacq, who commented on one of his first 6music programmes after returning from Austin that he felt it quite heartwarming that there were so many of us who were singing along to the Crookes because we knew all the words to ‘Afterglow’. We don’t dance alone, indeed.

“The night is still young, but the story’s so old.” The first part was most definitely true at 5 in the afternoon, but as you will read soon, my SXSW story wasn’t over just yet…

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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