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The Dunwells / September 2014 UK Tour

 
By on Monday, 4th August 2014 at 8:00 am
 

In just over a month’s time, Leeds quartet the Dunwells will be hitting the road for an extensive tour of the UK. These 13 shows are scheduled around the band’s forthcoming EP ‘Show Me Emotion’, which is due for release on the 8th of September. Take a listen to the title track below the tour date listing. Tickets for the following shows are available now.

Friday 5th September 2014 – Leeds Wardrobe
Saturday 6th September 2014 – York Fibbers
Sunday 7th September 2014 – Halifax Arden Road Social Club
Thursday 11th September 2014 – Bristol Louisiana
Friday 12th September 2014 – London 229
Saturday 13th September 2014 – Sheffield Plug
Wednesday 17th September 2014 – Leicester Shed
Thursday 18th September 2014 – Stratford No 1. Shakespeare Street
Friday 19th September 2014 – Newcastle Think Tank
Saturday 20th September 2014 – Hull Fruit Space
Tuesday 23rd September 2014 – Birmingham Hare and Hounds
Friday 26th September 2014 – Manchester Academy 3
Saturday 27th September 2014 – Glasgow ABC

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrUTEDs4Clg[/youtube]

 

Live Gig Video: The Dunwells perform ‘Light Up the Skies’ at Karamel Club for Songs from the Shed

 
By on Monday, 11th November 2013 at 4:00 pm
 

Two of the Leeds band the Dunwells recently performed for Songs from the Shed, who describes themselves as specialising “in hand made acoustic video sessions filmed in a garden shed”. Where this was filmed wasn’t exactly a garden shed – it was instead taken at the Karamel Club in Wood Green, a small multi-purpose theatre/arts venue part of the Chocolate Factory arts centre in North London – but this is a lovely performance of the band playing their song ‘Light Up the Skies’. Watch it below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qt-woBFF17A[/youtube]

 

SXSW 2013: Day 4 evening – hits and misses around Sixth Street, and Kilimanjaro and PRS for Music showcase at Latitude 30 – 15th March 2013

 
By on Wednesday, 3rd April 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

After a bit of a breathless afternoon running after Irish bands and in and out of venues on Sixth Street, I gave myself a break on official festival evening #4 at SXSW 2013 to have a civilised dinner at a steakhouse (paid for by a Christmas gift card from work) before I was out and about again for shows. The initial plan was simple: I was going to try and see a couple bands near and dear to some of my writers, capping off the night with one of my favourites. It didn’t entirely go to plan, but actually, later that night, things turned out better than I ever could have imagined…

The Virginmarys SXSW live

The first stop was dive bar 512 for the Virginmarys. This was the stop for WWJD, as in “what would John do?” The queue assembled outside the club was kind of what I expected: hard-looking men with or without long hair. Being a Friday, a lot of locals were trying to buy their way in with single tickets, but I was whisked right through the doors with my wristband. Then came probably one of the loudest, most punishing sounds I’ve ever put my body to the test with.

I really tried, John, I really did. But I could only hold my own against the Virginmarys for a grand total of two songs. It’s not uncommon for my body to feel like it’s vibrating when I’m seeing a dance band, but having the skin of my cheeks vibrating from a rock band some good distance away from me? Guitars crashed and the drums bellowed as frontman Ally Dickaty gave it his all in screamy, growly vocals. Yes, hard rock is alive and well in Macclesfield. You can be sure of that. While I made my getaway, I watched as Austinites headbanged with unbridled delight to the music. This band might not be for me, but they were definitely ticking off the boxes of many punters.

Jovanotti SXSW live

Next on my agenda was to head to Bethell Hall, a smaller multi-purpose room at St. David’s Historic Sanctuary, located in the same building where I’d seen the Communion showcase in 2012. I was going in that direction for the Dunwells, who Cheryl saw and interviewed in Washington when I was in hospital the previous month with flu. I had looked forward to that DC gig for so long and to have it robbed from me, the only recourse was to see them in Austin and say hello. In hindsight, I should have done some more research on what exactly this ‘Grammy Museum – Musical Milestones: 50 Years of the Beatles’ was. I arrived to hear the recognisable musical strains of ‘Yesterday’…sung in Italian. What?

I had been so confident – probably overconfident – that since nearly every showcase I’d attended had started and run late that week, I would have arrived just in time for the Dunwells. But instead on ‘stage’ was long-running and beloved by his countrymen arrist Jovanotti, oddly wearing a red knitted hat like the bassist in Y Niwl on Tuesday night at Huw Stephens’ UK Trade and Investment showcase. He made a joke about translating English into Italian isn’t always accurate, which caused a roar from the crowd. I frowned as he jauntily launched into an entirely Italian version of ‘I Saw Her Standing There’. As a longtime, longtime Beatles fan, let me just tell you, that is probably one of the weirdest moments in your life, hearing a song that is burned into your brain…but it’s an entirely different, unexpected form. Batting 0 for 2 so far for the night.

Getting to the church requires scaling a hill, and I flipped through my SXSW guide for where to go next. I decided to cut my losses and go back down the hill and straight to Latitude 30, even though I’d done no research for all but two of the bands playing there that night and had not expected to arrive so early. Helpfully, George Waite of the Crookes explained to me that Kilimanjaro was a tour promoter in Britain, so at least I knew the background of our hosts; the other ‘host’ was PRS for Music, who benevolently has granted many a UK band funding to come over to America for SXSW. I missed highly-feted Luke Sital-Singh and just hung out until the next band was due on stage. Okay. Can someone tell me when turtlenecks are ever necessary in Austin? I could say the same thing for red knitted hats, but this turtleneck thing was a first in the week.

Ruen Brothers SXSW live

The Ruen Brothers, actual brothers Rupert and Henry Stansall from Scunthorpe, get extra points for purposely coordinating their outfits and hair (white turtleneck and platinum blond hair; black turtleneck and dark hair) but I seriously questioned their wisdom wearing the turtlenecks *and* blazers even in the thick of an Austin night. Their bass player had a quiff to rival Boz Boorer‘s. This should have given the first clue to what kind of music they play. (In case you haven’t heard of Boz Boorer, he’s a rockabilly artist with his own band the Polecats but he’s also famously known as a guitarist of Morrissey‘s touring band.) And rockabilly is exactly what we got, with their lead singer fancying himself the second coming of Elvis, complete with the curled lip and swiveling hips and vaguely sounding like Roy Orbison. Okay, but not great.

Then we went from a bunch of guys in suit jackets to a bunch of kids in denim and t-shirts. China Rats from Leeds were in the building. I’ll admit, the one song that stuck with me when I looked them up for the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2013, ‘(At Least Those) Kids Are Getting Fed’, sounded pretty good live. I think what kind of irked me about them – and something that I am sure kids here in America will love and latch on to immediately – was the sneery, Sex Pistols-y, anti-establishment vibe I was getting from them.

China Rats SXSW live

And indeed, Nylon magazine here have already taken a shine to them, which shows how the tide back to guitar music has already turned here in this country: just a few years ago, the same rag was getting hot and bothered over Friendly Fires and Patrick Wolf. If anyone dares to remember, their grammatically incorrect debut single ‘To Be Like I’ is a lot sweeter and Beatle-y, sounding nothing like this punk version of themselves they are now. Similarly, ‘Take No Prisoners’ is a less frantic attempt at the Libertines. China Rats have been compared to the Clash and the Ramones by Clash Magazine, but hold up here: they’re very young and I think we need to see some longevity and in this version of the band before making any hasty comparisons!

You know how I was whinging about bands cancelling earlier in the week? This night, I was actually glad that another band I knew had cancelled, because I otherwise would have had to split the difference between a club on Red River Street, many, many blocks northeast and Latitude 30 for the 11 o’clock hour. With the other band cancelling, I was free to watch Sheffield’s Crookes without having to worry about having to up and go to see someone else.

The British Music Embassy at Latitude 30, from what I gather, is truly where British bands come to play, wanting – and needing – to shine while they are here in America. While I think ‘make or break’ is the wrong term to use because it is so final, you definitely want to bring your A game to your BME appearances, and for most bands, you only have one such shot all week to prove to the people watching you that you matter. And in some cases, that you deserve an American recording contract. For Reverend and the Makers and Cave Painting, Wednesday afternoon was when they needed to and did shine. For a poorly Jamie N Commons who did not appear on Friday night and was replaced by Berlin-based Englishman electronic artist Seams, it was an opportunity wasted. For the Crookes, they had a coveted evening slot on Friday night with I’m sure many industry folks in attendance.

The Crookes Kilimanjaro PRS SXSW 1

As a longtime fan of the Sheffield band since they got their first plays on BBC Radio and having seen them totally smash it at a daytime showcase for the Orchard at the Great Escape last year, I was now interested to see how the new songs from summer 2012’s ‘Hold Fast’ album would go down in Austin. As mentioned in my Friday afternoon report, there was a devoted American contingent of mostly Austin and Dallas natives who were following the Crookes around wherever they were playing. In 2010 I had a conversation with a punter and small time DJ from San Francisco at a Postelles show at DC9; I had recommended him that if he liked the Postelles, then he would probably like the Crookes as well. (Bit of trivia for you: both bands independently covered Wreckless Eric’s ‘Whole Wide World’. What are the odds? They were meant to be together!) “The Crookes? Who are the Crookes?” He gave me a look of confusion. And that is usually the expression I get when I tell anyone I know in DC about one “English band I like” or another. So to have a specific group of people who knew all the words to the songs, who knew when to clap or snap their fingers without being told by the band *and* them not being English themselves, that really blew my mind. I had serious reservations that I would be the only person at their shows singing along, but instead, I got drowned out!

As it should be, the band concentrated mostly on the new album material, but they couldn’t leave out old favourites ‘Bloodshot Days’ or ‘Backstreet Lovers’ (but of course). It was at this show that I fully came to appreciate ‘Where Did Our Love Go’, a song written for their former guitarist Alex Saunders, who left the band in 2011 to get a ‘real’ job: “you’re on the clock, I’m out of time / were you ever a friend of mine?…you work to live, I live to dance”. It’s a tender ode to a friend who used to be part of their tight unit of brothers, their gang, until reality ducked its head into their lives and changed things forever for the band.

It was then, as our merry group of revelers danced to the immortal words “I wonder if you know / we don’t dance alone!” that I was reminded why Daniel Hopewell’s lyrics are often compared to Morrissey’s in his Smiths days. There is something incredibly comforting in being able to dance your cares away, to lose yourself in a joyful melody, but wrapping yourself in lyrics that touch your heart in that moment and mean so much. Of the ones I have been able to decipher and put my finger on, Hopewell’s lyrics have always been a happy and emotional discovery to me and proven to me that the Crookes are not just four young, cute English boys who happen to play in a guitar band. While the first part of this is clearly true from their very devoted ‘Bright Young Things’ young fanbase who I’m guessing are mostly fond of the frenetic pace and carefree guitars of their seemingly happy-sounding songs, I’ve learnt how empathetically intellectual their songs are for me. I am keeping my fingers crossed that they will get signed here soon for the former reason and that the wealth we are being given from the latter will bleed over to the fans once they make it here.

The Crookes Kilimanjaro PRS SXSW 2

The crowning moment of their set was at the end, when they jumped into the crowd to do an impromptu version of ‘The Cooler King’. Hopewell was tasked to play acoustic guitar, while singer/bassist George Waite harmonised perfectly with guitarist Tom Dakin and drummer Russell Bates, all providing the requisite claps and wolf whistles to faithfully recreate the same feeling of the track from the album but in a live setting. Of course our group had to participate as well. Hopewell stated in a past interview with us that ‘American Girls’ was inspired by their first trip to SXSW in 2010; I hope that means that on the next album there will be a song written alluding to the magic of this night, because I don’t think it really gets any better at SXSW than this.

Just Like Dreamers
Maybe in the Dark
Where Did Our Love Go
American Girls
Bloodshot Days
Sal Paradise
Sofie
Afterglow
Backstreet Lovers
The Cooler King (acoustic and in crowd)

 

(SXSW 2013 flavoured!) Interview: David and Joe Dunwell of the Dunwells

 
By on Wednesday, 13th March 2013 at 11:00 am
 

Ahead of their appearance at SXSW 2013, Cheryl sat down with brothers David and Joe Dunwell of the Leeds band The Dunwells before their show in DC in mid-February to talk about country music, alphabet soup radio stations and buskers with dogs.

Welcome, is this your first time in DC?
David: Second time in DC, we did a small show during the last tour, so that was in 2011. Hmmmm, oh yes, we were at the Birchmere [which is really outside of the city in Alexandria, Virginia]. Originally, we came to America and came to Memphis for the first time, that’s where we met our management and they brought us back out to record our album.

I am confused on the trajectory of your album, how many times has it been released?
Joe: It’s only been released twice. It was released under an independent label called Playing in Traffic and was released in February 2012. Then it was re-released when we got resigned, and the album got repackaged and we added a few new tracks, but the same title for the album and was out the 28th of August of last year. So it’s a year old in theory, but it feels like it’s just been released.

So did you get a chance to see anything of the city before load in?
Joe: We didn’t. Today has been a hectic day. We did radio all over the place. WRNR in Annapolis and Sirius FM and……
I don’t mean to put you on the spot
David: There are so many letters in your radio stations.
Yeah at home you just have numbers – 1, 2, 6. It’s a lot harder to do it over here. You basically have to get on Sirius or a tv show.
Joe: Sirius is playing us, so that’s good. The Pulse is the one playing us.

I saw that you put out the EP ‘Leaving the Rose’, what inspired doing that?
Joe: That’s kind of just to keep the buzz going in the UK because we are spending so much time in America. Just to have something in the UK to let them know we’re not ditching them. We love the UK and we are looking forward to being back in Yorkshire.
David: We had an amazing opportunity in Los Angeles to do an acoustic session at the Village Recorder, loads of people have recorded there like the Rolling Stones, and Biffy Clyro were in that studio. So we were really excited. It was this magical day where we set up in a circle and we started playing the acoustic versions of the songs.

How did you pick ‘Hide & Seek’ – which is my favourite Imogen Heap song ever?
David: We just love the song.
Joe: I played it one night, and Jonny was there and liked it and it’s been in our back catalogue and history quite a while.
I have to say, it’s is perfect. And while the EP is only available in the UK, so I can’t get it, I was thrilled to find that ‘Hide & Seek’ is available as a free download from your web site. (I later discovered they were selling the EP at the gig, so I did get to buy it!)

Have you been doing anything else, writing on the road while you are here?
David: We are always writing, we always have to be prepared. To be honest, writing is something that we do to wind down as a band. Just to sit and write music is a pleasure. So we’ve actually done loads this tour. It’s also useful to be able to keep changing the set around and play new songs while we’re playing.
So we will hear something that’s not on the album tonight?
Yeah you will. It’s fun for us.

I hear a lot of influences of American country music in your songs. Is that something that you grew up with?
Joe: That’s unintentional, I think it comes from the style of guitar playing, the five part harmonies adds a country twist to it.
David: We’re a fan of American music, I don’t think five lads from Leeds really knew that we were fans of country – that wasn’t really a goal, we were just fans of American music in general. But I take that as a complement that you hear that in our music.

It seems that you are riding the current wave of alt-folk/folk-rock thing here, is that something you set out for or was organically how the music came about?
Joe: We just play our music and see what happens. A lot of people have come up to us and said, “your time is now”, but how do you ever know when you time is? We’ve been slugging it out for 3 and a half years and we just love what we’re doing.
David: Folk rock did not just disappear and gone oh this is good and been brought out of the box again.
But it certainly is in a resurgence. I’m covering a lot of that right now.
David: But there have been folk-rock bands playing for ages and haven’t had the media attention and now all of a sudden they do.

Do you listen to that on your own? Because I am always surprised at how different the music is that artists listen to compared to what they produce.
David: I’m definitely a folk rock fan. I love singer-songwriter style.
Joe: The Frames, Damien Rice, Glen Hansard, English bands like Elbow and Radiohead, so mishmash all that together.
David: American influences come from Ryan Adams and singer/songwriters like that as well.

Mentioning Glen, did you guys used to do a lot of busking early on? Did you ever have a really funny stories like when the guy stole all his money in ‘Once’?
Joe: We did used to do a fair amount of busking because we used to play a lot of pubs and clubs. But no, nothing funny, there were a lot better buskers out there than us. There was a guy with three dogs. He took all the credit. They’d bark along to his songs, they were great .

The opening track on your album (‘I Could Be a King’) I hear of Of Monsters and Men in it, big time. I’m sure you get compared to a lot of different artists right now. Who do you think has been the most favourable comparison that you’ve gotten?
Joe: That’s the first comparison to Of Monsters and Men. We’ve been compared to Mumford and Sons a lot which isn’t a bad thing because 1) they’re a great band, and 2) they are doing amazing well, they’ve kind of opened the floodgates for this kind of music right now.

Have you heard of Milo Greene from LA? They have five members and four lead singers, so you are only one off! But they literally say they have no lead singer and rotate through everyone except the drummer. How do you decide who’s going to take lead on a song?
David: Whether it’s the person who wrote the song, or who had the idea for the song, normally they take the lead vocal. But normally you can feel it as well, Joe’s got a really big powerful voice that sits on top of the big loud parts so Joe would take the big choruses.

Being brothers and cousins and school chums, how does that work in with how you deal with your music? Does familiarity breed contempt or is the longevity what gets you through?
David: We’ve all known each other for such a long time, but we’ve got such different tastes in music it makes it quite interesting when we come together to rehearsal spaces and fight it out. That’s how we get the results that we are all happy with. We make sure that we try to listen to everybody and get everybody’s ideas on the table.
You said that with a huge grin, does that mean there is a lot of fighting?
(laughter) David: No, no fighting’s not the word!
Joe: We have five big personalities in the band and I think that’s what gets us through.

If you could duet with someone, who would you want it to be?
David: I would love to stand in on one of Coldplay’s tours, that would be wonderful to sing a song with Chris Martin.
Joe: Guy Garvey from Elbow. I’ve been listening to the back catalog of his stuff and he just a very clever man.

Well thank you so much for talking the time to talk to me, see you out there.
Cheers!

 

(SXSW 2013 flavoured!) Live Review: The Dunwells at U Street Music Hall, Washington DC – 20th February 2013

 
By on Thursday, 28th February 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

It’s always a good sign when I go to a gig for an unfamiliar band and then spend the next day singing their songs over and over in my head. Thus it was with the Dunwells, a quintet from Leeds currently making their second sweep through America. Their album ‘Blind Sighted Faith’ was released a year ago, now on Concord Music Group, and they are making the rounds at loads of radio stations and small venues, truly the only way to get a foothold on the American music market. I walked into the venue for my interview with them to hear them soundchecking vocals with ‘Folding Stars’ from Biffy Clyro. A broad smile spread across my face, I was going to like these guys!

The Dunwells Washington 2

Showcasing their three lead singers with their first three songs, you knew it was going to be a remarkable show. Although David Dunwell introduced Jonny Lamb their singing drummer as being “very rare, like pixies”, I doubt anyone would mistake him for a woodland nymph, but I admire any drummer who can take the lead on vocals while playing. It’s quite a feat. They built a strong set, introducing their trademark soaring harmonies with the title track from ‘Blind Sighted Faith’. Ably switching between David Dunwell, Lamb and David’s brother Joe, the songs were poignant with their heartfelt lyrics flowing right through you: “You’re not supposed to miss what was never yours / you don’t have to borrow me / ‘cause I’m yours, I’m yours to keep”. Incidentally, not many bands can pull off five-part harmonies, not many at all. But we were treated to a cover of Imogen Heap‘s ‘Hide and Seek’, with all five members standing at the front of the stage in perfect gorgeous harmony.

The Dunwells Washington 1

I see a lot of bands that fall into the folk/rock or singer/songwriter category, so I frankly feel a little silly referring to a guitar player as an ‘axeman’ because most of the players I see don’t rise to that level. Not so here. Dave Hanson was a standout guitar player playing proper solos and everything. That boy can play and rightful deserves the axeman moniker! During ‘I Want to Be’, Joe Dunwell was left alone on stage with his acoustic. The gorgeously simple rendition perfectly highlighted his powerful and flexible vocal capabilities.

The Dunwells Washington 3

The Dunwells’ live show is a straight up indie rock show and they gave us nearly their entire catalog including a few new tunes as well. While I can hear clear influences of American country music in their recorded work, that seems to melt away in the live show. Still, David Dunwell quipped that it felt strange to be an Englishman standing before a crowd of Americans professing to play a quite American instrument, the banjo.

I had spoken to the tour manager beforehand to learn that there was no support act. Hmmm, early night for me. But it was so worth it. Talking with some people at the front, a gaggle of fans had followed them down from their gig the previous night in Philadelphia, and was happy to wax poetic about their favourite band. And while not filled with a lot of raucous singalongs, the band sent everyone home soaring. I can see the ground swell of love for the band taking over. Next time they are in town, they will surely be at the next sized up venue. At the very last, Joe and David Dunwell acknowledged the thunderous applause as they concluded their set by proudly taking a step to center stage, to bow together as brothers. And then to stretch out the glorious moment, they ended on what they do best, the last few notes in perfect harmony.

After the cut: set list.
Continue reading (SXSW 2013 flavoured!) Live Review: The Dunwells at U Street Music Hall, Washington DC – 20th February 2013

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2013: Singer/songwriter and folk UK artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Tuesday, 29th January 2013 at 11:00 am
 

Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2013 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change.

So here we are, the last week of January. Each Tuesday we’ve been bringing you genre ‘chapters’ of the UK bands that have been given the all important shout for this year’s SXSW 2013 taking place in venues across Austin the 12th to the 17th of March 2013. On the 8th of January, we brought you the pop and pop hybrid acts list, with a follow-up addendum on the 14th of January after the SXSW people updated their books on the 10th. The 15th of January saw the posting of the sound heavyweights, on the list of rock, metal and punk acts. Last week, on the 22nd, we wanted to showcase the wizards of the music world with the list of electronic and electronic-based bands and DJs.

This week? Possibly the genre that is most prolific – and the most crowded: the singer/songwriters and folk artists. Last week it was interesting to read that in an interview with SPIN, singer Scott Hutchinson of Scottish band Frightened Rabbit complained of being compared to current folk rock behemoths Mumford and Sons. Love ’em or hate ’em, they brought folk rock to the forefront of popular music and proved that that brand of ‘popularised’ bluegrass could be popular around the world. There is no doubt a whole new generation of folk rock artists that are being given a second glance, instead of being ignored, thanks to the hard work of Mumford and other acts soldiering on in this genre. And then there are the singer/songwriters: we may romanticise the image of a solitary, guitar-wielding man in front of a crowd, the reality is that there are both men and women who are pouring their hearts out into song, sitting in their bedrooms wondering what might be. In that respect, SXSW does its best in giving these folks the proper credit – and surely the proper platform – that might propel them into the big time.

What I had envisioned this weekly guide to be was simply a handy resource if you were wondering which acts to catch at this year’s marathon week of showcases, parties and secret shows. But even if you’re not attending the big event, I hope it’ll also introduce you to the solo artists and bands you haven’t heard of, because that’s the most exciting thing about SXSW: at any one moment, you could walk into a bar, a club, a hotel, a warehouse, wherever…and you might just discover the next big thing in music. And that isn’t limited to one place or one event. You can find new music anywhere. And without further adieu…

‘Allo Darlin – Australia collides with Britain in this folk pop band fronted by Elizabeth Morris. Their songs are so cute, you wish you could just pinch their cheeks! Martin caught them at the End of the Road Festival in 2011.

Sounds like: the Pains of Being Pure at Heart, with a female lead

Read our previous coverage of the band here.

Lauren Aquilina – This 17-year old is from Windsor, but knock off the Royal Family jokes, please. She independently released her debut EP ‘Fools’ in October, so what a coup to get the SXSW nod when you’re still unsigned!

Sounds like: Lucy Rose, Ellie Goulding (but minus the synths)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uodUCtmCRME[/youtube]

Jake Bugg (added 10/01/13) –Noel Gallagher’s young protégé who has already found fame in the last year at the Great Escape and Liverpool Sound City, the Nottingham native has made folk and country guitar rock popular again with his debut album

Read our previous coverage of Bugg here.

Bo Saris – blue-eyed soul delivered in a falsetto. It’s difficult for me to listen to, but if a Dutchman described as ” the new, male equivalent of the late Amy Winehouse” doesn’t make you shrink in horror…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-cUVZThQVs[/youtube]

Bwani Junction – Edinburgh band invoking the Afrobeat spirit of Vampire Weekend with their jaunty guitars. They even describe themselves as “Big Country were from the Soweto”. They made their Great Escape debut in 2012 with the Scottish contingent, so it seems only fitting that they make their SXSW debut this year.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbYjSamxS30[/youtube]

Matt Cardle (added 10/01/13) – the winner of the 7th season of the UK’s X Factor, it’ll be interesting if his popularity in Britain will translate into fame in America.

Jamie N Commons – Has singing the blues, just like plaid shirts, become trendy again? If yes, then Jamie N Commons is its poster boy. And if for some reason you miss him and you live in America, don’t fret: he’ll be supporting Lianne La Havas (his fellow BBC Sound of 2012 longlist alum also at SXSW) on her North American tour directly following the festival.

The Dunwells – it is unfortunate that in the post-Mumford and Sons world, other folk bands that came out in 2009 were left behind. Hopefully, Leeds’ Dunwells will use this opportunity in Austin (and New York in January and Colorado in March post-SXSW) to show everyone just how talented they are and they’re not Mumford wannabes.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDuv-cG5rtM[/youtube]

Paloma Faith – imagine my surprise to hear that Paloma Faith is now on my mum’s approved list, after watching her perform on Graham Norton. I’m kind of interested to see what kind of people would show up to see her in Austin: Amy Winehouse fans?

Read our previous coverage on Paloma here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvHiflzabHg[/youtube]

Fossil Collective – If you transported the Byrds to Leeds, what would they sound like? Probably something similar to Fossil Collective. I might have compared them to Fleet Foxes, except that in the press shots I’ve seen of Dave Fendick and Jonny Hooker, only one of them has a beard so…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYPBPVoACgE[/youtube]

For some mp3s and John’s review of their EP ‘On and On’, head here.

Goldheart Assembly – Having loved their 2010 debut album ‘Wolves and Thieves’, I felt like it’d been nearly forever since I last heard anything about Goldheart Assembly. When I checked on TGTF, the last thing I’d written on them, a post about their single ‘Harvest in the Snow’, was posted in March 2011. It’ll be 2 years, then, when they make their way to Austin, and not a moment too soon. Were they waiting for the Fleet Foxes love – and expected backlash – to die down? We’ll never know for sure, but I for one will be eager to see them live for the first time.

Catch all our previous Goldheart coverage here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeRse7-lXM4[/youtube]

Ed Harcourt – Compared to the other singer/songwriters on the SXSW list, Ed Harcourt is a relative granddaddy – at 35, he’s released five studio albums to date, with an sixth, ‘Back into the Woods’, to follow in late February 2013. ‘The Man That Time Forgot’, the first song to be offered up from the new album, can be downloaded for free here.

Robyn Hitchcock – When your own Web site is called ‘a museum’, you know you’ve paid your dues to the music industry. This is where cult singer/songwriter Robyn Hitchcock finds himself, revered in the UK for his English eccentricity, though I am very curious at the kind of turnout for his shows at SXSW and indeed, where they will have him play.

Jesca Hoop (added 10/01/13) – to some of us, she’s better known associated with Elbow. Not actually British (she’s a Californian transplant to Manchester after Guy Garvey discovered), she started with a very eclectic sound which turned decidedly poppier with ‘Hospital (Win Your Love)’, the last time we checked in with her.

Read our previous coverage of Hoop here.

James Hunter – from the same town as Lammo (Colchester) comes this r&b and soul singer, previously nominated for a Grammy for his 2006 album ‘People Gonna Talk’. This is exactly the kind of music I don’t usually seek out, so I’m rather keen to see him play. I’m imagining the scene to be as hopping as JD MacPherson’s at last year’s Great Escape.

Josephine – if Morrissey was a young black woman, he might just sound like Josephine. (And yes. I didn’t believe Paul Lester either until I heard ‘What a Day’.) I haven’t heard her debut album but I’ve been told the rest of it doesn’t sound Smiths-esque, so you can’t blame Manchester for it.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hngRpjPafI[/youtube]

Kodaline – Gary Barlow’s favourite new band from Dublin doesn’t show any signs of slowing down after getting a BBC Sound of 2013 longlist nod, We’ve written quite a bit about this band, so you can read all of that here. They have new EP out in March, and the promo video for its title track ‘High Hopes’ is below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4povfmX144[/youtube]

Cate Le Bon – Cate Le Bon is a breath of fresh air compared to most of the other Welsh acts tipped for 2013’s SXSW, which appear to all be thrashy, hard rock bands made up of men.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swJNnYHFPWA[/youtube]

Sounds like: Beth Jeans Houghton with a fixation on death

Let’s Buy Happiness – happy guitar rock/pop band from Newcastle.

Sounds like: ‘Allo Darlin, without the harmonies.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-1nLr6Gl4I[/youtube]

Jim Lockey and the Solemn Sun – Jim Lockey sans band was the first band of the Xtra Mile Recordings showcase on my first night at SXSW 2012, so let’s see if he can manage to bring his entire band out for 2013. I think of his as ‘Frank Turner lite’, if that helps you imagine what he sounds like.

Read our previous live coverage of Jim Lockey and the Solemn Sun here.

My Darling Clementine – ‘country/soul’ duo from Birmingham by husband/wife coupling Michael Weston King and Lou Dalgleish. Long Facebook profiles seem overdone to me, so…

Willy Moon (added 10/01/13) – placing #6 in the TGTF 10 for 2012 readers’ poll, signing to Jack White’s Third Man Records, having one of his songs play on a new iPod advert in America? Willy Moon’s life just gets better and better. A little bit pop, a little bit soul, a little bit ‘50s styling for one hip sound.

Read our previous coverage on Willy here.

Tom Odell (added 10/01/13) – Having already won the BRITs 2013 Critics’ Choice award, the sky’s the limit for this Chichester-born singer/songwriter.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwpMEbgC7DA[/youtube]

Christopher Rees – Cardiff singer/songwriter that NME describes like this: “It’s not easy to achieve noise metal god status accompanied by a cello but Christopher Rees makes an awesome, bloody fist of it. Pumped up and snarling but managing to wrench beautiful tunes out of the wreckage… This is seriously amazing stuff”. This description has us intrigued!

Roo Panes – ‘classical folk pop’ is not a genre normally explored here, but I’m always up for a challenge. This is Andrew ‘Roo’ Panes’ project with a strong backing and voal harmonising band. He has already been singled out for his handsomeness, as Burberry chose him to model their autumn/winter 2012 collection. Given Mumford and Laura Marling‘s recent meteoric rise to fame in America, Roo Panes is the odds-on favourite to follow in their footsteps.

Sounds like: he should be signed to Communion, if Ben Lovett hasn’t come sniffing round yet

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGP-TnIoejk[/youtube]

Lucy Rose – We, of course, already knew how talented she was. But 2013 could just be the year that Lucy Rose breaks out of Bombay Bicycle’s shadow and becomes a huge worldwide success in her own right. Though I worry what would happen to Lucy if she suddenly became massive; would she stop doing the things like Tweet at her mother on Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable that make me go, “oh, bless!”? A scary prospect…

Read our previous coverage on Lucy Rose here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adBPg8Zdp2g[/youtube]

Paul Thomas Saunders – it must be hard to be Paul Thomas Saunders, a Leeds singer/songwriter in his late twenties and allergic to alcohol. But I guess he must use all that extra free time not boozing at the pub to write. Evidently I missed a “triumphant” appearance at last year’s Great Escape. Need to rectify that.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EILsIxupmcM[/youtube]

Jack Savoretti – part Italian, but that’s where any comparison to Paolo Nutini ends. Savoretti has already been on the road with Corinne Bailey Rae and shored up Radio2 support, but why isn’t he massive? Just wait until one of his songs gets synced on a major film soundtrack.

Sounds like: a harder, more pop Bob Dylan, a gentler Bruce Springsteen

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umBAmzf0SXs[/youtube]

Skinny Lister – this London folk band have already made quite an impact on America, through a previous appearance at SXSW and then an even more surprising appearance last year on the Vans Warped tour of North America. Could they be riding the Mumford wave? Possibly. Their debut album ‘Forge and Flagon’ gets an American release this month, so we’ll see if the momentum lasts.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsqaLfWMcp8[/youtube]

The Staves – three harmonising sisters with guitars from Watford who are no stranger to America, having toured here a couple times now with the (now defunct?) Civil Wars, I was surprised to see them get another turn at SXSW. If they do get an opportunity to sing in St. David’s again like in 2012, go, go, GO. You won’t be disappointed.

Story Books – Kent band sounding at times haunting and at times bombastic. Not really sure why they’re not more popular or, frankly, why we haven’t heard of them yet.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLumIFt_tFQ[/youtube]

Richard Thompson – like Robyn Hitchcock, I’m not entirely sure what Richard Thompson is doing on a list of acts scheduled to perform at SXSW. Having already made a name for himself as a member of Fairport Convention and then with his wife Linda and now as a solo artist, I suspect he’ll be using the guest spot to advertise his latest album ‘Electric’, out in February.

Washington Irving – jaunty folk rock wrapped around a Scottish accent.

File next to: Arcade Fire

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvKKXbgCnyc[/youtube]

That’s it for the genre chapters in the TGTF Guide to SXSW in January. To not miss any of our SXSW 2013 coverage, bookmark this tag and of course, keep it here on TGTF for even more great content in the weeks leading up to the big event in March!

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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