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SXSW 2015: Lost in Austin Boat Ride – 19th March 2015

 
By on Friday, 3rd April 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

On the Tuesday morning of SXSW 2015, Mary and I attended a lovely St. Patrick’s Day brunch on a boat, hosted by Generator NI and Invest Northern Ireland. The following Thursday morning, I made my way once again to the Hyatt Regency Austin boat dock to attend another riverboat brunch showcase, this one curated by none other than Oisin Leech and Mark McCausland, also known as TGTF favourites The Lost Brothers. The lineup for the Thursday morning show, hosted by Honeycomb Creative Works and Generator NI, included several of the artists we’d seen on Tuesday morning but also had a few surprise twists to match the curves and turns along our meandering path down the Colorado River.

After a brief introduction by Honeycomb Creative Works’ Fiona McElroy, The Lost Brothers played the morning’s opening set, including their own folk duets and some particularly well-considered covers, chosen to feature the guest musicians appearing on the brunch showcase. The first addition to the program was Irish violinist Colm Mac Con Iomaire, who added his lovely and expressive instrumental timbre to The Lost Brothers’ warm acoustic sound.

Lost Brothers and Colm Mac Con Iomaire 19 March 2015

Leech then introduced another special guest, whose presence was designed to energise the easygoing brunch crowd gathered on the riverboat. Austin-based songwriter and producer Will Sexton, with whom Leech and McCausland had become acquainted on a previous trip to SXSW, joined the group for a delightfully improvisatory set of songs with a very definite blues vibe, including a cover of Townes Van Zandt’s ‘Ain’t Leavin’ Your Love’.

Lost Brothers and Will Sexton 19 March 2015

Will Sexton at Lost in Austin 19 March 2015

The mood on the boat then changed once again with a solo performance from Colm Mac Con Iomaire, who treated us to some of the exquisite violin melodies from his new album ‘And Now the Weather’, due out on the 17th of April. Mac Con Iomaire displayed his range and versatility in two contrasting pieces, the broad and soaring ‘Eimar’s Dream’ from his first album ‘The Hare’s Corner’ and the poignantly sad ‘Sappho’s Daughter’, inspired by Irish poet Theo Dorgan. I was able to catch Mac Con Iomaire for a quick chat on Friday during the Full Irish Breakfast at BD Riley’s; the audio for that interview will be posted here on TGTF in the coming days.

Colm Mac Con Iomaire at Lost in Austin 19 March 2015

We took a collective intermission after Mac Con Iomaire’s set, and I headed to the boat’s upper deck to take in the scenery. When I came back down, I found the audience already regrouped for Northern Irish pop quartet GO WOLF and alt-rockers-turned-acoustic-crooners More Than Conquerors. I caught their performances from a slightly different angle than I had on Tuesday morning, while the casual Thursday brunch crowd in the main cabin enjoyed hearing the bands in this unusually quaint setting.

GO WOLF at Lost in Austin 19 March 2015

More Than Conquerors at Lost in Austin 19 March 2015

As the riverboat headed back to the Hyatt Regency dock, The Lost Brothers took the stage area once more, this time accompanied by a new acquaintance, Austin’s own Will Webster, better known locally as Ragtime Willie. Webster had the opportunity to regale us with his skills on both banjo and fiddle during this final spontaneous set of tunes with Leech, McCausland and Mac Con Iomaire.

Ragtime Willie at Lost in Austin 19 March 2015

Ever the gracious hosts, The Lost Brothers finished out the morning by accepting a request for an encore performance of their charming version of ‘Moon River’. Those of you reading along in the UK might have a chance to hear this lovely cover yourselves, as The Lost Brothers are set to begin a run of April tour dates supporting fellow TGTF friends Stornoway on select dates.

 

SXSW 2015: BBC barbecue with friends, with no fear of missing out – 19th March 2015

 
By on Monday, 30th March 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

One thing everyone learns at SXSW – and hopefully sooner than later – is to not sweat it when plan A doesn’t work out and you have to go to plan B, or even plan C or D. It is an inevitable fact of a city festival and the size of their smaller hole in the wall type venues (whether you’re in Austin or Brighton for the Great Escape) that if where you want to go is one of the hottest tickets in town, you’ll likely be disappointed. But during SXSW, there is always tonnes more things to do and bands to see, and the beauty of such a large event is that you might just happen upon something brilliant you’d otherwise never have crossed your mind.

The announcement that Danish band Mew were going to play only three shows in Austin seemed to be broadcast on all the music Web sites and blogs ahead of SXSW 2015, and I can’t say that I really was bothered about seeing them. However, as a music editor, it’s sometimes your duty to seek out what the people want to read about, so I had them scribbled down on my Thursday afternoon schedule as part of the Under the Radar magazine showcase at Flamingo Cantina. Wednesday afternoon I chatted with Will Doyle (East India Youth) about the Under the Radar show, as he was playing directly before Mew and headliner Of Montreal; he was quite pleased to be playing the showcase, as it meant he had an automatic in to the event. Curious, we looked up the capacity of the place on my phone, staring at the number with a mixture of marvel and horror: 299. Eep.

Considering how massively hyped the elusive Mew had been even before anyone made it out to Austin, I figured I’d probably be queueing outside all afternoon with no joy, so I decided to give it a pass. Later that night, I ran into a close Glaswegian industry friend (a much bigger, taller person who can hold his own more than I can, I might add) who said he’d made it into the showcase but stayed only for 5 minutes because there were too many people inside the club and he had struggled to breathe. I understand event organisers want to hype things up and purposely cause queues to form via FOMO, but it sounds like this particular event may have been violating safety codes, and I count my lucky stars I didn’t even try to get into it. Our friend Larry Heath, Editor-in-Chief of The AU Review, got into Mew’s third show on Saturday afternoon as part of the Brooklyn Vegan day party, and you can read his thoughts on them here.

But no tears were shed by this editor. I’d been blessed with an invite to the BBC barbecue that afternoon at Old School Bar and Grill, which had some lovely surprise live and acoustic special guests. Due to a mishap with the #17 bus, I arrived too late to catch first act James Vincent McMorrow, who appeared Wednesday night at the Music from Ireland showcase at Maggie Mae’s Gibson Room (I reviewed that showcase here). Apparently Catfish and the Bottlemen were also due to appear on the afternoon’s bill, but they were nowhere to be seen. Another surprise for me was the sense James ‘Chaos and the Calm’ Bay was following me around, as the man and his now famous hat were seen going back and forth across the floor. I think he liked the food?

Frank Turner at BBC Barbecue, SXSW 2015

Between dining on the complimentary barbecue from venerated Texas meat institution the Salt Lick (which was delicious, thank you BBC and Salt Lick!), I watched amazing sets from now hugely popular singer/songwriter Frank Turner and the soft-spoken young Derry talent SOAK (Bridie Monds-Watson). Turner, who was bouncing from venue to venue all week and seemed to be in his element in this town, explained he was road-testing new material at SXSW and was playing different sets at every show in Austin; I’m sure this revelation delighted fans I met who were following him around all week. From the new song that he introduced with “this is about losing at tennis…again” (‘Love Forty Down’) to his raucous, yet loving tribute to his nan (‘Peggy Sang the Blues’), Turner proved why he’s become such a popular live draw both here in America and in Europe. Carrie interviewed Frank Friday morning in Austin, and her interview will be posted soon here on TGTF.

SOAK, the surprise guest at Monday night’s Creative Belfast showcase at Latitude 30, also captivated punters this afternoon with her gentle yet emotional voice, framed by her acoustic guitar playing. You wouldn’t expect something as placid coming from someone dressed like a skater, but somehow…it works. She now has a deal with Rough Trade, so I know Beggars will certainly help spread her music far and wide.

SOAK at BBC Barbecue, SXSW 2015

I met the lovely Bridie briefly late one night at the British Music Embassy, just as she was thanking Steve Lamacq for all his and BBC Introducing’s support. It was a sweet yet important reminder of how vital these mutualistic relationships and respect are key to our promoting deserving young artists and giving them the help and attention they deserve. Later on, I also helped facilitate the recording of a live BBC 6music session by my friends the Lost Brothers, who appeared on Steve’s radio programme. I take great personal pride in my part of the process, and I think everyone who is anyone in the industry who comes out to a massive event like this at SXSW with the purpose to help support bands should pat themselves on the back!

 

SXSW 2015: St. Patrick’s Day Brunch on a Boat with Generator NI – 17th March 2015

 
By on Friday, 27th March 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

At the close of the Creative Belfast showcase on Monday night, editor Mary and I were invited to attend a special St. Patrick’s Day Brunch on a Boat, sponsored by Generator NI and Invest Northern Ireland. The boat launched from the Hyatt Regency Austin boat dock and floated down the Colorado River for a couple of idyllic hours on Tuesday morning, while we were treated to muffins, mimosas and intimate, scaled back performances by several of the showcasing bands from the previous evening.

The first artist to perform on the brunch lineup was Hannah McPhillimy, who is the keyboard player for Belfast pop band GO WOLF, but who is also a talented singer-songwriter in her own right. She performed a brief set of her own tracks, showing her versatility by switching from the ukulele to the keyboard for her accompaniment. I was enchanted by the sweetness of McPhillimy’s voice and by the very different songwriting style in her solo work compared to that of GO WOLF, so I was well pleased when she agreed to an interview with me at the end of the boat ride. (You can take a listen to her interview here, if you haven’t already.)

Hannah McPhillimy at St. Patrick's Day Brunch 17 March 2015

McPhillimy was assisted by her GO WOLF colleague Scott Jamison during part of her solo set, and at the end of her performance, the full band came up to take their turn on the stage. The vivid synth pop we had heard from GO WOLF at the British Music Embassy the night before mellowed easily in this quieter setting, matching the cordially relaxed mood on the small open air boat.

GO WOLF at St. Patrick's Day Brunch 17 March 2015

Perhaps the most breathtaking performance of the morning was by alt-rock quartet More Than Conquerors, who in a rather unexpected stylistic transformation, appeared here as an acoustic trio. Kris Platt’s strident vocals, which cut so well through the band’s full electric sound at Latitude 30 the previous night, were softened and delicately harmonised by drummer Jamie Neish and guitarist Danny Ball, while bassist Danny Morton looked on from the small back deck of the boat. I was surprised, to say the least, to hear this band sound so lovely in an acoustic setting, but the sensitive performance of ‘The Great Deceiver’ we heard here is evidently a mainstay in the band’s live repertoire, though it hasn’t appeared on any of their recorded releases to date.

More Than Conquerors at St. Patrick's Day Brunch 17 March 2015

The final act on the brunch’s music lineup was a somewhat more predictable choice, folk duo The Lost Brothers. Mark McCausland and Oisin Leech were clearly in their element playing to a small room of quiet listeners, performing from a seated position and tapping their toes in unison with one another as they sang. They took the opportunity to show off their seamless vocal harmonies with a lovely performance of ‘Under the Turquoise Sky’ and closed the curtain on the morning’s festivities with a charming cover of ‘Moon River’ as the boat headed back into the dock.

The Lost Brothers at St. Patrick's Day Brunch 17 March 2015

Special thanks to Mark from Generator NI for inviting us along on the Tuesday morning river cruise. Stay tuned to TGTF in the coming days for coverage of another river-related event from later in the SXSW 2015 week.

 

SXSW 2015: Creative Belfast Showcase at Latitude 30 – 16th March 2015

 
By on Thursday, 26th March 2015 at 10:00 am
 

I arrived in Austin for SXSW 2015 on Monday the 16th of March, a day that fell at the crossroads between the end of Interactive festival and the official beginning of Music festival. As in the past, this intersectional Monday night was the scheduled date for the Creative Belfast showcase hosted by the British Music Embassy and Generator NI. More than a simple networking opportunity for the Northern Irish contingent at SXSW, the showcase was also set to feature three of the best up-and-coming music acts from Belfast and its environs as well as one of the area’s seminal punk bands, recently reborn to the modern era.

Opening the musical activities for the evening were folk duo The Lost Brothers, comprised of Oisin Leech and Mark McCausland. Their flawless vocal harmonies and poetic lyricism draw more than a passing comparison to the famed American pair Simon and Garfunkel, winning the attention of NPR here in the States and the BBC back across the pond. The Lost Brothers’ most recent LP release ‘New Songs of Dawn and Dust’ (reviewed here by editor Mary) expands slightly on the sparse instrumentation of their traditional Americana style, but on this night the pair depended solely on the blend of their voices and acoustic guitars. Luckily for those of us in the audience, that enchanting combination is all The Lost Brothers really need in order to demonstrate their expressive artistry and finely tuned craftsmanship.

The Lost Brothers at Creative Belfast 16 Mar SXSW 2015

Following The Lost Brothers’ set, the night’s emcee, Mark Gordon of Generator NI, announced a special guest addition to the music lineup. With a plea for silent attention, Gordon introduced the youthful and delicate Derry singer/songwriter Bridie Monds-Watson, known professionally as SOAK. Reserved almost to the point of shyness, SOAK nevertheless possesses a quiet confidence on stage that belies her youthful age. She chooses to let her songs speak (or perhaps sing) for themselves, and from the moment she began, her audience listened raptly. I didn’t immediately engage with SOAK’s singing voice when I listened to her debut single ‘Blud’ early last year, but the fragile grace of her vocal sound in live performance, combined with her deeply introspective lyrical style, left a much stronger impression in my mind on this occasion. Watch for her upcoming debut album ‘Before We Forgot How To Dream’ on Rough Trade later this year.

SOAK at Creative Belfast 16 Mar SXSW 2015

Following SOAK’s quietly triumphant SXSW debut, the British Music Embassy stage played host to Belfast indie pop quartet Go Wolf. Having just released a new EP titled ‘Running’, they played an enthusiastic and irresistibly danceable set including the eponymous track featured in our SXSW preview of artists from Ireland and Northern Ireland. Before the evening kicked off at Creative Belfast, I had a chance to chat with Go Wolf’s frontman Scott Jamison about the EP; head this way to hear what he had to say. Go Wolf’s trippy beats and bright synth sounds were a welcome burst of energy at this point in the evening, raising the level of excitement in the room for the acts still to come on the lineup.

Go Wolf at Creative Belfast 16 March SXSW 2015

Raising the decibel level in the room was left to More Than Conquerors, who turned out to be more than up to the task. Their hard-hitting alt-punk set naturally included recent single ‘Red’ as well as tracks from their debut LP ‘Everything I’ve Learnt’. Frontman Kris Pratt’s vocals rose above the raucous volume level of their sound, hinting at a strong melodic foundation that Mary and I would see on display in an acoustic setting later in the week; be sure to watch TGTF for more on More Than Conquerors at SXSW 2015.

More Than Conquerors at Creative Belfast 16 Mar SXSW 2015

Segueing from modern alt-punk to a classic 70’s punk sound, veteran Belfast band Protex are seeing a resurgence of interest after some of their original Polydor recordings were discovered and re-released by New York’s Sing Sing Records in 2010. Originally formed in 1978 after The Clash’s historic visit to Belfast, Protex were quickly signed to Polydor after releasing singles on Rough Trade and Terri Hooley’s Good Vibrations label. The band officially split up in 1981, but have reformed with a new lineup including original member Aidan Murtagh along with Norman Boyd, John Rossi, and Gordie Walker. Aside from providing their audience with an opportunity to look back on the history of rock music in Belfast, Protex showed above all that they still have the rock ‘n’ roll chops to share a stage with younger up-and-coming talent as they brought the Creative Belfast showcase to a blistering close with hit track ‘Don’t Ring Me Up.’

Protex at Creative Belfast 16 Mar SXSW 2015

At the end of the evening, Mary and I had a quick chat with Mark and were fortunate enough to be invited to a St. Patrick’s Day brunch with their team the following morning. Several of the bands featured above played at that event in a setting quite different to the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30. Keep it here at TGTF for coverage of the St. Patrick’s Day brunch to be posted soon.

 

Top Albums of 2014: Editor’s Picks

 
By on Monday, 22nd December 2014 at 11:00 am
 

When it comes time for a music editor to review the year’s releases, it’s something that should not be done lightly. With great power comes great responsibility. This will be my fifth top albums of the year at the helm of TGTF, so this year I feel this even more so. Without a doubt, 2014 was politically tumultuous, not only literally with the Scottish referendum and all that’s happening with Obama vs. Congress and Cameron vs. Parliament, but also on the music front, where we saw Apple buy Dr. Dre’s Beats Music and enable U2 to give iTunes users a free album they never asked for, Taylor Swift withdrawing all of her songs from Spotify, and online streaming outpacing and resoundingly beating download purchases.

I’ve got no industry crystal ball in front of me, but it’s clear 2015 will bring additional challenges for the music business. Companies will need to look to and develop new models and new sources of revenue, and at the same time, artists and bands will need to retool and reinvent themselves to not only endure and survive but thrive in these exciting, challenging times. With that, I turn your attention to the albums I deemed the most worthy of your purchase from this year, as I tell you about the artists who made them.

1. Teleman‘Breakfast’ (Moshi Moshi); Teleman on TGTF
It’s the most important meal of the day, isn’t it? So it makes uncannily appropriate sense to start with Teleman’s debut album. A lot has been made about the differences in sound from three out of four of their members’ previous band – the now-defunct Pete and the Pirates – and yes, they do sound different. There are buzzy synth lines by the Pirates’ former drummer Jonny Sanders, and overall, the sound is more pop than the rock of their previous band. The live experience, as I thankfully finally got the chance to witness in New York City in September, is a whole lot of fun too.

But the most important pieces have stayed constant: the band’s excellent songwriting and singer Tommy Sanders’ voice, going from angelic (opening track ‘Cristina’) to borderline vitriolic (‘Mainline’), depressive (’23 Floors Down’) to frantic joy (‘Skeleton Dance’), and everywhere in between. The jewel of the crown of ‘Breakfast’ is, I suppose somewhat ironically, the most difficult day and time of the week, ‘Monday Morning’, where Tommy Sanders shows yearning alternating with ire as he expresses regret about a relationship that could have been so much more…but wasn’t.

The album’s brilliance as a whole is that no two songs sound the same, yet they’re all about transport and the action of moving or leaving, and in a way that I’ve never been touched by before. I’ve laughed to this album, I’ve cried to this album, I’ve contemplated the meaning of life to this album. It hasn’t left my car since I got it for review in May, which says a lot. Magnificent, Teleman. Truly magnificent.

2. Sir Sly‘You Haunt Me’ (Interscope); Sir Sly on TGTF
I’m sure you readers have noticed I generally go out of my way to avoid mainstream artists who by some “miracle” just jump to success off the back of a major label. American indie rock / r&b trio Sir Sly have been around for a bit, but I didn’t pay much attention to them until I queued up ‘Where I’m Going’ as part of my research on them a couple of weeks prior for their co-headline slot on a North American tour with Wolf Gang. (Read my review of their show in Washington DC in September here.) I was hooked immediately by the sultriness of singer Landon Jacobs’ vocals, paired with a electronic pop / funk background that’s catchy as all hell yet mysterious.

Their debut album for Interscope finally dropped in mid-September, and it’s a pop masterpiece. Title track ‘You Haunt Me’ shows the band at their poppiest, with a bouncy, infectious rhythm guaranteed to make you pogo, while the synths gleam and glitter with the best of them. Yes, there is a commercial thread running through this album – a remix of ‘Gold’ was used to great effect to sell Cadillacs to young people in an American telly advert this year – but dark, buzzy beats on ‘Ghost’, rattling percussion on ‘Nowhere/Bloodlines pt. 1’ and the oozy smoothness of stretched synths accompanied with the painful vocal delivery in ‘Too Far Gone’ prove Sir Sly are no one-trick pony. In a world where pop, r&b and electronic struggle to coexist peacefully on the charts, this is one band that proves it can be done, and done very well. Expect them to be the next massive pop/r&b act.

3. The Crookes‘Soapbox’ (Fierce Panda); The Crookes on TGTF
And now, for something with a bit harder edge. Which sounds a bit strange coming from the happy, peppy, back to basics New Pop of Sheffield’s Crookes, doesn’t it? From the starting discordant guitar note of first single ‘Play Dumb’, they made it evident to the world that they wanted to be and should be taken seriously, which totally makes sense on an album called ‘Soapbox’. Prior to its release, it was a big year for the band, as they explained to me in an interview after SXSW 2014, having signed to American label Modern Outsider in 2013 and headlining their night that week in Austin at Parish Underground.

While the foursome didn’t entirely reinvent themselves, they really ratcheted up the quality of the songwriting on their third album. ‘Echolalia’ and ‘Howl’ exhibit a sadness you feel deeper through their words and music in such a different way than from their previous releases. ‘While You’re Fragile’ and ‘Outsiders’ confirm lyricist Daniel Hopewell hasn’t strayed far from his usual direction; at the same time the band haven’t lost their pop sensibility altogether for which they have become favourites with their fans. Hopewell said in an interview for One Week One Band’s Crookes feature earlier this month, “I think I’m more honest now. And hopefully my writing is improving so I can express simplistic, honest ideas in a more beautiful way”. Taken together with how they’ve changed musically from 2012’s ‘Hold Fast’, ‘Soapbox’ seems to suggest there is plenty more room for the Crookes to grow, both in lyrical and musical artistry.

4. The Lost Brothers‘New Songs of Dawn and Dust’ (Lojinx); The Lost Brothers on TGTF
When two people are destined to be musical partners, you can listen to a single song of theirs and on some subliminal level, you just know. I don’t want to make it sound like the songs contained within ‘New Songs of Dawn and Dust’ are basic; rather, it’s a true testament to the Liverpool-via-Ireland duo’s gifts to us – beautiful singing voices and incredible guitar dexterity – that they can make indie folk sound so effortless, yet so gorgeous.

This is the ultimate autumnal folk record, probably best listening to late at night. You can practically hear the fallen leaves crunch under your feet as you listen further through the effort. From the gentle simplicity of instrumental ‘Nocturnal Tune’, on through the heartbreak experienced by the actions of one ‘Derridae’, then to the anguish of a disillusioned fighter in ‘Soldier’s Song’, there is a lot of poignancy to feel here. But then you get to a track like the seemingly too happy (for them; I talked to Leech about this in a recent q&a) ‘Walking Blues’, and you know the sun will rise again. All in all, remarkably restrained beauty.

5. Sivu‘Something on High’ (Atlantic); Sivu on TGTF
After several singles and EPs scattered over the last year or so, James Page’s debut album was long awaited by me, especially after chatting with him at SXSW 2014 and seeing him live in Austin. It was a special privilege to be present for his LP’s launch party at Hackney Oslo in mid-October, bearing witness to quite possibly his first overzealous fan and stage crasher. So what is it about ‘Something on High’ that can cause such crazed devotion?

Page has separated himself from the other guitar-toting, may I say boring male singer/songwriters (for one, hello, entitled Ben Howard in Norwich) or ones who are trying for the r&b votes (like Hozier, whose popularity still makes me groan). How? There is beat, experimentation and strings in opening track ‘Feel Something’; earlier single ‘Can’t Stop Now’ is inspiration in the form of sunny pop. Yet the true genius of ‘Something on High’ is just how much this album will lead you to think, to truly contemplate one’s existence, something truly rare when it comes to pop albums. Page examines the keys to human existence (‘Miracle [Human Error]’), the desire to start over (‘Bodies’) and crushing self-defeat in the face of heartbreak (‘Sleep’) and in such a sensitive, yet stunning way.

 

(SXSW 2015 flavoured!) Quickfire Questions #79: Mark McCausland of The Lost Brothers

 
By on Monday, 15th December 2014 at 11:00 am
 

Irish singer/songwriter duo The Lost Brothers put out a great album this year (‘New Songs of Dawn and Dust’), so naturally we wanted to get into their brains so they would tell us about their musical upbringing. In case you’ve been living under a rock, last week we ran a two-part interview with Oisin Leech of the duo, which you can catch up reading here and here. However, the epically bearded half of the trio Mark McCausland wanted in on this too, having kindly answered our TGTF Quickfire Questions. He tells us about his first and sadly ill-fated love, and the fond memories of a song that he and Leech cover at live shows. Read on…

What song is your earliest musical memory?
Sitting on my grandfather’s knee and him singing hundreds of Irish songs, blowing a harmonica that he kept on a string around his neck.

What was your favourite song as a child?
My mother and my uncle used to sing ‘Dream Dream Dream’ by the Everly Brothers. It’s probably the first song I ever knew how to sing. We cover it now at Lost Brothers shows.

What song makes you laugh?
Garth Hudson’s organ solo in ‘Apple Suckling Tree’ on the Basement Tapes (Bob Dylan) is pure joy and always conjures [up] a smile.

What song makes you cry?
‘I’m So Lonesome I Could cry’, Hank Williams.

What song reminds you of the first time you fell in love? (It’s up to you if you want this to be sweet, naughty, etc.)
You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling, the Righteous Brothers.

It’s the first song I ever danced to with a girl. I was a squirt, weighing in at 12 years and 4 feet. She was 4 years older than me and mountains taller.

It didn’t last.

Which song (any song written in the last century) do you wish you’d written yourself?
‘What a Wonderful World’. [It’s probably not what you’re supposed to think when you hear this song, but I can’t help but be wistful about the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy BBC miniseries. – Ed.]

Who is your favourite writer? (This can be a songwriter or ANY kind of writer.)
For books…John Fante. Willy Vlautin. John Steinbeck. William Kennedy. And Nick Cave’s two novels are brilliant.

If you hadn’t become a singer/musician/songwriter/etc., what job do you think you’d be doing right now?
I’m pretty much unemployable.

Cheers to Mark for answering our questions and also to Terry, who arranged for all of these Lost Brothers interview bits for us.

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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