Things changed here in April 2019. Because of COVID-19 travel restrictions and show and festival cancellations, no new content has been added here since February 2020.
To connect with us, visit us on Facebook and Twitter.
SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Quickfire Questions #102: Tyla Campbell of The People The Poet

 
By on Wednesday, 2nd March 2016 at 11:00 am
 

Ahead of SXSW in Austin in mid-March, just as we have in the past 2 years of our preview coverage of the big dance, we’ve been bringing you showcasing artists’ answers to a special SXSW 2016 flavoured set of Quickfire Questions since last week.

The person giving us his answers today is a representative from a band who I think are pretty special. I met Welsh band The People The Poet last year at SXSW 2015, and I’m so pleased that thanks to the benevolence of Horizons / Gorwelion, a scheme delivered by BBC Cymru Wales in partnership with Arts Council Wales to develop new, independent contemporary music in Wales, they’re getting another opportunity to perform for everyone in Austin in 2 weeks. Read on for guitarist Tyla Campbell’s answers to this special edition of the TGTF Quickfire Questions. For all of our coverage here on TGTF on The People The Poet, go here.

Describe your music / sound in three words. (We know, tricky…)
Ambient indie rock. Or plain and simply rock ‘n’ roll.

What are you most looking forward to doing while you’re in Austin?
We were lucky enough to be at SXSW last year and didn’t have time to check out the Stevie Ray Vaughn statue, being a guitarist I really respect him as a player. He hasn’t inspired directly as such but John Mayer has and he’s deeply influenced by Stevie, so I would like to get a cheeky selfie with the statue. Of course, we’re gonna be checking out as many bands possible and sampling as much BBQ as we can handle!

Of the bands who have already been announced, do you have any that are must-sees on your schedule? If yes, who are they and why?
Yes, I’ve been keeping up to date with the announcements. The festival is so diverse but acts that spring to mind include The Cult, Sun Kil Moon, Bloc Party, The new Iggy Pop and Josh Homme project and for nostalgic reasons the band Rooney who I will always remember performing on the programme The OC when I was 15!

Name something you’re packing in your suitcase that we might find unusual. (You are welcome to elaborate.)
It’s not unusual but last year I forgot suntan lotion, which I deeply regretted! So this year I’ll make sure to pack factor 30 or above! [This is a good tip to EVERYONE. Especially those of you from Britain, Ireland and Scandinavia who tend to sunburn and sun peel easily! – Ed.]

If we happen to run into you in a bar, we’d like to buy you a drink. What is your tipple of choice?
I’m happy to drink beer all night long, and I’ve especially been getting into my local ales recently. But if I knew the person buying me a drink was loaded with cash? I would definitely take advantage and ask for a double rum and Coke, please.

What advice would you give other bands who have never played at SXSW before?

Try and make a plan of what you want to achieve at SXSW so you make sure that you’re being productive but try and give yourself some spare time to explore Austin and its surroundings. Last year we went to ashooting range on our first day, went to a rodeo on our final day, and went swimming in a natural springs pool!

Now, let’s get into our usual list of Quickfire Questions…

What song is your earliest musical memory?
An embarrassing video of me at the age of 7 went viral on my social networks last year due to my brother uploading a video of me rocking out and singing to AC/DC’s ‘Highway to Hell’, so I would have to say that. I was quite impressed that I knew the words to ‘Highway to Hell’ at the age of 7 though!

What was your favourite song as a child?
It was all about car mix tapes when I was younger. Certain songs that come to mind is Joe Satriani – ‘Rubina’s Blue Sky of Happiness’ whilst driving to Cornwall on holiday with my family. That and just the ‘Hall & Oates’ Greatest Hits’. I was lucky enough to see them live at a festival we played recently and they blew my mind!

What song makes you laugh?
Any of the songs that South Park release. Most of the titles you probably can’t publish, so we’ll just leave it as that!

What song makes you cry?
In all honesty the last time I cried would have been at my Grandmother’s funeral years and years ago. So I would have to say Des’ree – ‘I’m Kissing You’, as that was the song played at her funeral and it’s such an emotional and powerful song in its own right.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2MihwQSnX4[/youtube]

Which song (any song written in the last century / 100 years or so) do you wish you’d written yourself?
There’s so many to choose from, I’d probably have a different answer everyday. Today I’d say The Airborne Toxic Event – ‘Sometime Around Midnight’. My mate’s band were supporting them in a small venue in Cardiff so we stuck around, not knowing what to expect but they just blew all our minds! Especially that song, I was obsessed with it for months, I just love how the song just gradually builds every verse and the use of strings is fantastic and the lyrics are just genius.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYPoMjR6-Ao[/youtube]

Who is your favourite writer? (This can be a songwriter or ANY kind of writer.)
One of my favourite bands are the Eagles and I was absolutely gutted when I heard about Glenn Frey’s passing. So I’d say Glenn Frey, or the Frey/Henley partnership. They wrote so many great songs together that could soundtrack a lifetime.

If you hadn’t become a singer/musician/songwriter/etc., what job do you think you’d be doing right now?
My previous jobs included working in retail and at a screenprinting studio, neither of which I really enjoyed. I was however interested in media at a point, and I studied it for my A levels, so maybe writing for a music publication!

If God said you were allowed to bring only one album with you to Heaven, which would it be and why? (Sorry, but double albums do not count.)
One album, you say? Again, a tough one. I think maybe because I listen to it in some shape or form whilst going to asleep every week Sigur Ros – ‘Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust’ (yes, I copied and pasted that). I’m sure that album could help me rest in peace.

Cheers, Tyla, for answering our questions. See you and The People the Poet in Austin, brutha!

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Huw Stephens with PRS for Music and British Music @ SXSW at the British Music Embassy – 15th-16th March 2016

 
By on Monday, 29th February 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

The British Music Embassy will return to Latitude 30 at 512 San Jacinto Boulevard, right by the heart of the action off 6th Street during SXSW 2016. Get ready, because the lineups are looking pretty brilliant! In this post, I’ll be previewing the talent on show from Tuesday evening through Wednesday evening. We’ll be running additional previews of the BME’s programming later this week, including another one by me on the artists of Thursday’s bill and Carrie’s own to tip the offerings all day Friday and Saturday to close out the festival.

As he has done for many years running, BBC Radio 1 specialist presenter Huw Stephens will be hosting the opening night of festivities at Latitude 30. This year, this showcase is being put on with the auspices of the UK music copyright, licensing and royalties body PRS for Music. Huw has put together an eclectic bill with no two acts in the same exact genre. Get down to the venue early to experience Kent’s self-described ‘dirty pop’ quartet Get Inuit (our past coverage of them here), who are currently working on their debut album, with help on its financing thanks to the kind backing of PRS themselves. Lo-fi post-punk will be provided by Belfast’s Girls Names (our past coverage of them here). They released their fourth album ‘Arms Around a Vision’ on Tough Love Records last autumn. The scuzz in your ears from the first two bands will be washed out by the social commentary of Hertfordshire teenager Declan McKenna, who I profiled last month in this SXSW 2016-flavoured Bands to Watch feature.

Pop continues on in an equally unique but slightly different way with the quirky yet lovable Oscar. He will be releasing his debut album ‘Cut and Paste’ on Wichita Recordings in May. For the next act on the bill, a head up to the North West is in order for Liverpool’s Clean Cut Kid and their bouncy, indie pop melodies and amazing harmonies. Rebecca profiled them with recent tourmates and fellow SXSW 2016 showcasing band Fickle Friends back here in January. The night will be closed out with the pomp and oomph of hip hop of South London’s Loyle Carner, using his rhymes to express his perspective on life.

The music continues Wednesday afternoon at the British Music Embassy. Chad Valley is Oxford’s own chill wave artist Hugo Manuel when he’s not busy with his other band Jonquil or remixing the work of his mates Foals, among others. He’ll start the day’s activities with synthy goodness. He’s followed by Welsh band The People The Poet, one of BBC Radio 2’s Dermot O’Leary’s favourite discoveries from last year’s festival (read our past coverage on the band here). The bill then turns its focus to Cheshire-bred singer/songwriter legend Jane Weaver. The lineup stays in the North West for former Liverpool choir boy turned pop artist Banners, who released his self-titled EP last month on Island Records (read our past coverage on him here, including Rebecca’s Bands to Watch from January). The afternoon’s programming ends with East Hampshire trio and Transgressive Records signees Blaenavon. Their in-your-face sound was recently reigned in for this recent Burberry Acoustic video for ‘Dragon’ live in Manchester.

Latitude 30 will reopen for Wednesday evening at the British Music Embassy for the previously previewed BBC Introducing and PRS for Music Foundation night. It will begin with a touching tribute to the late Viola Beach and their manager Craig Tarry. The band from Warrington were due to open the BBC Introducing night before they who lost their lives tragically in a car accident in Sweden last month. We encourage all to attend and pay their respects to our fallen friends.

 

Video of the Moment #1919: The People The Poet

 
By on Monday, 21st September 2015 at 6:00 pm
 

Welsh band The People The Poet, who delivered some of the most rousing performances at this year’s SXSW 2015, laying it down Tuesday night and Saturday afternoon at the British Music Embassy, have a new video out this week for their next upcoming single. As its title suggests, ‘Matchday’ is sport related, specifically rugby when you watch the promo for it below. However, the heart of the song is about staying true to what you believe and never giving up, and the anthemic style of the tune is directly in line with that feeling. Have at it below.

‘Matchday’ will be released on the 9th of October.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_K_pZMmOnA[/youtube]

 

Liverpool Sound City 2015: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 5th June 2015 at 3:00 pm
 

Ten years ago, staring at MTV Rocks on the television with my Dad, the lyrics “she don’t use butter, she don’t use cheese, she don’t use jelly or any of these” set me on a path. A path which started with me purchasing the rest of The Flaming Lips‘ back catalogue in one bulk purchase, and ended at Liverpool Sound City on The Atlantic Stage, with a sensory overload courtesy of Wayne Coyne and co. A fantastic booking for the festival.

But before then, I of course had to get to the festival, which as I learnt on the Thursday, is no mean feat – seeing as it is a good 30 minute walk from the main Liverpool city centre. My solution? A rented bike, a tactic that when I whizzed past the thousands of revellers waiting for taxis (for an hour and a half in some cases) and stumbling drunkenly back to the City Centre made me incredibly smug, and the revellers entirely mugged off.

Once I’d locked up outside of the new festival site, which looks certain to be the festival’s home for the foreseeable future, I ventured to The Atlantic Stage for a set that would begin a week of social media awkwardness. Almost supergroup The Serpent Power were gracing the stage, made up of Ian Skelly (The Coral) and Paul Molloy (The Zutons) and a few other less well-knowns…

The result, an utterly forgettable set full of wallpaper music:- the kind of self-indulgent psychedelia with noodling solos galore that you’d expect from a super group, but perhaps not one with the song-writing credentials The Serpent Power brought with them. With droves of punters at The Atlantic Stage deciding to make haste somewhere else, it was obvious their brand of new indie was really striking accord with the flower crown in their hair bunch and not much else.

So when I tweeted the following:


I didn’t really expect to wake up the next day with The Serpent Power feeling I had struck a nerve:

Now while they may have got it spot on about my run-of-the-mill willy, the set was still sub-par. The ‘banter’ was probably the highlight, so maybe social-media comedy is the way to go? But as the cliché goes, don’t give up your day jobs. (5/10)

From the largest stage, to the smallest: Service Bells were next up on The Record Store stage, which effectively was just a small tent with speakers and the ability to sell records. The intimate surroundings lent to Service Bells’ set superbly, as their Queens of the Stone Age-influenced rock bounced and reverberated within the tight confines. Over waves of feedback, Fraser Harvey’s cutting vocals hit the back of the tent, their visceral drum and guitar assault working to draw a packed out crowd into the tight confines. Although their set was brief, they teased perfectly to their later performance on The Kraken Stage, by giving just a taste of the aggression of their music. (7/10)

From blood and guts rock ‘n’ roll, it was on to alternative new wave electronica with Dutch Uncles on The Atlantic Stage. It’s a bit of a departure but a welcome one, as the four-piece pull out all the stops to make it a feast for the senses. Despite the rather overcast and glum setting in Liverpool, Dutch Uncles serve up an almost samba beat, with hips shaking and a calypso rhythm uniting the audience in their booty shaking. Duncan Wallis juts and throws his way around the stage as Andy Proudfoot, Robin Richards and Peter Broadhead provide a glittering calypso boogie. Their colourful backdrop and the verve and enthusiasm imbued in their performance meant gave a summery outlook for what was a rather gloomy setting, as they transported us to a beach, ‘Club Tropicana’ style.

Striking an uncanny resemblance to Game Of Thrones character plump, yet loveable buffoon Samwell Tarly, lead singer of the next band Leon Stanford captured the entire crowd with his wit and lack of comprehension for how close all the stages were. In honesty, the Tarly lookalike had a point seeing as what could be made of his beautiful Gaslight Anthem-esque vocals was mostly drowned out by the thumping bass emerging from The Cargo Stage behind him.

Despite these facts, The People and the Poet cut through the walls of sonic obscurity as well as they could and played a brilliant set. The storytelling was encapsulating and Stanford’s cutting wit meant your attention was affixed to the Welsh four-piece. My only confusion was how Welsh they sounded speaking, and how un-Welsh they sounded making music. In fact, it felt more like a band from the Midwest of America, which did have me scratching my head. Despite the tonal confusions, The People and the Poet stood out on the Saturday as arguably the stand out band with their brilliant turns of phrase and superb delivery, even in the face of adversity… (8/10)

The joyful summer party atmosphere of Dutch Uncles was supplanted at The Baltic Stage, giant empty warehouse, by the feeling of a proper old-school punk show, courtesy of aged-retainers The Membranes. Old-school punk has a certain, er, look. The Membranes, quite simply ARE that look: shirts off, muscles rippling, dodgy haircuts that they probably couldn’t pull off 30 years ago and are no closer to doing so now and a menacing look upon the frontman’s face. They were every bit the grizzled bunch of punkers that the tagline ‘still inspired by punk rock but believe music has no boundaries’ conjures up.

It’s not exactly note perfect, and ‘gritty’ is probably the best word to describe it as, with most of the audience affixed to the wrinkled prune John Robb marauding menacingly around the front echelons of the stage. For most of the set, regrettably for the aged-retainers, their post-punk growls and riffs just didn’t strike an accord, until their final hurrah when the band rallied for a rousing call and return effort. Stellar work for guys who look like they may need a defibrillator post-set. (7/10)

After a brief top-up at one of the beer tents, which looked drastically overstaffed and dramatically overegged for the actual level of trade they would be receiving throughout the weekend, I made my way to the end of the pier at The Atlantic Stage for a moment I’d waited more than a decade for. As the light of the sun disappeared and the artificial light began to illuminate the small strip of tarmac the crowd were kettled into, the stage was draped with various plastic tubes for the light-fantastic The Flaming Lips were about to set up. In true Wayne Coyne style, he helped with the soundcheck resplendent in his green latex froggy suit, with the rest of the band dressed equally as colourfully and dotted around the stage, intertwined in the maze of dangling tubes.

Coyne and co. began with a ballad in the form of ‘The Abandoned Hospital Ship’, a jangling soaring journey through the psyche of this era-defining trio. That’s all before The Flaming Lips really begin their orgy for the senses, with cannons full of ticker tape and a ‘Fight Test’ singalong, as giant blow up aliens join Coyne on stage. As Coyne takes us through a quick tour of the bands most successful singles, he stops the audience midway through a slowed down singalong of ‘Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, Part 1’. “I don’t know whether you KNOW how important the HYAH HYAH bit of Yoshimi is, but Coyne bellows, “it’s a marker as to the level of crazy the audience is”. Most of the crowd loomed around baffled, but as it came to the HYAH HYAH portion of the song, we got a proper shout from the audience.

The set never really peaked to a mass singalong, simply for the fact that most of the audience didn’t know a lot of the songs. But the encore of ‘Do You Realize?’ was a soaring chorus across Liverpool Sound City with everyone getting caught up in the lights and excitement of The Flaming Lips.

Despite this, disappointingly due to the niche market The Flaming Lips occupy the crowd never really fully got on board with the set on a musical level. As far as a feast for the eyes, they delivered a 10/10 performance, but musically there was a lack of connection as a band who have disappointed with its last three records struggled to hold the interest of the crowd. (7/10)

 

SXSW 2015: Saturday in Austin with familiar Brits, Scandinavians and Aussies – 21st March 2015

 
By on Thursday, 2nd April 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

Saturday in Austin for SXSW 2015 was another strangely miserable day weather wise. With rain intermittent for most of the day until the evening hours, at least it wasn’t chucking it down like it was on Friday. Still, with a grey sky, I wondered if the bad weather would keep crowds away on the last day of the big dance. When nighttime came, it was became clear from the long queues outside many of the venues – including Latitude 30, where your humble editor found herself stuck in the wristband queue for over 2 hours, including some time spent chatting with Kate Tempest and her band in said queue – that the droves had come out for one last hurrah.

Representing in my very red England jacket, my Saturday began seemingly inauspiciously. Stood in a queue, holding a brolly and trying in vain to look cool while waiting for doors to a venue to open isn’t really my idea of a great time. But this was all to get into the Brooklyn Vegan day party, as the New York culture Web site had a full line-up for both the indoor and outdoor stages at Red 7, including the third and final appearance of Mew. I wasn’t there for the Danes, however.

After the cancellation of an entire electronic showcase at Container Bar due to safety concerns about possible electrocution of the bands during the height of Friday afternoon’s rainstorms, I made it to East India Youth‘s (Will Doyle) last performance in Austin. This performance was certainly different than Huw Stephen’s curated night Tuesday at Latitude 30 for Cerdd Cymru : Music Wales; for one, my guess was the audience had never heard of him, though I was pleased to see his performance quickly won them over. It may have been only noon on a Saturday, but just like Tuesday night at 9 PM, Doyle gave it his all, throwing his whole body into the performance and he alternated between synth, sequencers, Macbook and last but not least, bass guitar. ‘Hinterland’, from his 2014 Mercury Prize-nominated debut album on Stolen Recordings ‘Total Strife Forever’, went down particularly well, punters’ heads bopping and nodding in approval of the huge beats and the sweaty, vigorous way they were delivered to us.

East India Youth at Brooklyn Vegan Saturday SXSW 2015

‘Turn Away’, the second cut to be revealed in February from ‘Culture of Volume’, was recently described by BBC 6music presenter Stuart Maconie as sounding like “an electronic madrigal”, and I fully agree. It’s a very emotional piece that I’ll discuss more in my album review coming soon on TGTF, so I’ll just say for now that the track is solid evidence to silence the naysayers that say electronica is cold and devoid of feeling. It’s also nice to see Doyle comfortable as a singer, nearly front and centre if you forget the table being there, as he emotes on a song like ‘Looking for Someone’, written back in the day when he was more known for being that guy in a suit behind the table being held up by apple juice cartons and gaffa tape.

From East India Youth, I went in search for another Youth – Lust for Youth, the project of Swede Hannes Norrvide, now based in Denmark. The lack of decent lighting in an otherwise very red Mohawk indoor stage made for a impossible photography situation to begin with. Then there was the stifling crowd situation: from what I understand having talked to some punters down the front, people had arrived early and were staking out spots for hardcore Pittsburgh act Code Orange, who would not be on stage for another 3 hours. Lust for Youth is an electropop band, so as can probably imagine, hardcore fans on the whole aren’t exactly their core audience. Couple that with overbearing bass in the mix obscuring Norrvide’s vocals – or at least making his voice sound more robotic than I recalled from their Sacred Bones Records album ‘International’ released last year – led to a less than compelling set. Maybe I just picked the wrong venue to see them at.

The People the Poet at British Music Embassy Saturday SXSW 2015

Sound was much better, as it always is, when I returned to Latitude 30 for the final British Music Embassy afternoon showcase of SXSW 2015, opened by Welsh hopefuls and now buzzed about band The People the Poet. Frontman Leon Stanford was never showing any sign of anxiety about playing for an international crowd on Tuesday night, but now he was entirely in his element, talking to us from the stage like we were old friends, speaking about his band’s experiences in Austin with fondness as if a seasoned SXSW veteran. Having done a live session with Dermot O’Leary for his Radio 2 programme earlier in the week, one hopes that their music will spread far and wide off the back of their two exemplary performances at the British Music Embassy.

Up next and back to back were two Scottish bands, United Fruit and Holy Esque Unfortunately, I couldn’t stay inside Latitude 30 for United Fruit, as I nipped outside for my interview with Tyla Campbell and Pete Mills of The People The Poet that had been delayed for days. Of what I did hear of them, it was loud and the band were lively. When I returned for Holy Esque, they were in the midst of laying down their bombastic, synth laden guitar rock. Oddly, I liked them better on the recordings I’d heard previously than live. It seemed louder and muddier in person. I wondered, since it was Saturday, if the staff at Latitude 30 had just cranked up all the knobs to 11? Would have made sense if it were true.

After Latitude 30 and running around town to conduct two interviews (one with Ryan of Rival Consoles, the other with Niall of Only Real), I treated myself to a taxi ride to take me to the last show I would cover at SXSW 2015. Melbourne’s Demi Louise, who I had become friendly with on Instagram, was playing her last gig in Austin for the week, an acoustic one, at the atrium stage of the Hyatt Regency south of the river. This was a special treat for me, as I have always loved the hotel shows I’ve managed to find and cover during SXSW, and this one was no exception.

Wearing a large-brimmed Stetson, she appeared onstage certainly dressed the part for Texas. Although her set was much too short, she played a nice smattering of tunes that showcased her songwriting ability, from describing the emotional pain of heartbreak that all of us, young and old, experience, to the more personal journey she’s gone on watching both of her grandfathers suffer from dementia in the song ‘Ruins’.

Demi Louise Saturday SXSW 2015

It was lovely to finally see her perform and also chat with her after her set, as it brought everything round full circle to what I feel is the most important part of TGTF’s work at a festival like SXSW: to help spread the music of artists we have come to know and love, especially for those who are just starting out and/or who aren’t well known. Yet. As long as I’ve got the passion within me, I’ll continue doing this for years to come, and I thank you for joining me for the ride, whether it takes us to Austin, Brighton, Sydney, and anywhere in between. SXSW 2015, that’s a wrap!

 

SXSW 2015: Tyla Campbell and Pete Mills of The People the Poet

 
By on Friday, 27th March 2015 at 1:00 pm
 

I can’t even imagine the daunting feeling, all the apprehension young artists must feel when they have gotten word that they’ve gotten a shout to SXSW and the next step is actually coming over and playing shows on the world’s biggest stage in Austin. This is what I’m envisioning must have been in the minds of all the members of The People the Poet from South Wales, who played two shows in Austin during the week, opening both the first night of programming at the British Music Embassy to usher in the music festival and the Cerdd Cymru : Music Wales night, then the start of the British Music Embassy programming on Saturday afternoon. In both cases, the band left SXSW 2015 punters in awe with their combination of emotionally charged lyrics and powerhouse instrumentation. From the second they got offstage Tuesday night, Austin was all abuzz over this young Welsh band who had clearly made their mark on the event in Texas.

They were a bit difficult to pin down but after their Saturday afternoon show, I was able to nab Tyla Campbell (guitarist and resident band social media maven) and Pete Mills (bass guitar) for an interview about their time out in Texas, including visiting a shooting range in Houston, then seeing this famous rodeo that Willie Nelson played in Austin; we here at TGTF have no idea about it, but I guess we’ll have to investigate next time we’re in town, especially since the organisers advertise children riding sheep. Tyla and Pete also tell me about their varied band influences, how their self-released album ‘The Narrator’, with stories entirely sourced from fans came about, and the importance of those fans.

One of the more famous punters at their Tuesday night show was Radio 2’s Dermot O’Leary, who was so taken by their sound that he had them in for a live session to perform ‘People’, which is the Lynyrd Skynryd-flavoured track I was telling them about! You can have a listen and watch to the session of the song below under the interview. (So wait a minute, I beat Dermot O’Leary tipping a band before him as well as Lammo? ::smug::)

For more information on The People the Poet, visit their Facebook or check out our past articles on them.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us

Privacy Policy

Keep TGTF online for years to come!
Donate here.