Things changed here in April 2019. Because of COVID-19 travel restrictions and show and festival cancellations, no new content has been added here since February 2020.
To connect with us, visit us on Facebook and Twitter.
SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Top Gigs of 2010: Editor’s Picks

 
By on Tuesday, 14th December 2010 at 11:00 am
 

I went to a lot of gigs this year. (If you need the evidence, my gig list is under the cut, click the link further down in this post.) The more amazing gigs you go to, the more difficult it is to choose your top 5 performances for the year. I haven’t taken this task lightly, and without further adieu, here are my top live picks of 2010:

5. Delphic at Washington’s DC9, Liberation Dance Party (Friday 8th October 2010) – Most of my local friends do not share my enthusiasm for gigging – or music, for that matter – so it took a special band to get most everyone I know to DC9 for Liberation Dance Party at the end of the work week.

Washington often gets a bad (and unfair) rap for stoic crowds – I’ve seen far worse in my travels. This night, the DC9 crowd were going mental for the Manchester band’s electropop/guitar rock sound, and I couldn’t have prouder. (Exhibit A: two blokes were stood right in front of James Cook, described by my friend Silvia as “Mister Super Dancer and his 7-foot tall friend” going absolutely crazy, dancing like loons, “it looked like this was the most exciting thing that ever happened to them”. Haha. If you were interested, Mr. SD was later seen picking Rick Boardman’s brain after the show.) I’ll be the first to admit, there is a touch of bitter sentimentality about this gig for me, as for a long while I thought this might be the last dance ever put on at DC9. (DC9 was closed since 15th October after a tragic death [cause of death still unknown] occurred on the street outside the venue. I was really sad about this, because I’ve seen some of the best gigs of my life there. But it looks like the club will reopen on Wednesday [15 December]!)

4. the Futureheads at Washington’s Black Cat (Friday 4th June 2010) – I remembering Tweeting earlier that Friday afternoon about how I was going to see the Sunderland band for the first time that night, and what did I find in my messages but a personal note from Barry Hyde saying, “we’re going to knock your socks off. see you B x”. Being the professional I am, I refused to let that touch of thoughtfulness bias my opinion of the evening, and I really needn’t have worried. They played hit after hit after hit with no signs of the onslaught abating. At one point, Hyde even yelled at an inconsiderate drunk who was causing trouble, and everyone cheered. Well done, Barrington Hydeous! For a while I was almost sure this was going to be my top gig of 2010.

3. the Temper Trap at Boston’s House of Blues (Wednesday 29th September 2010) – You know how sometimes you can just feel greatness? Just two gigs in on a month-long tour of North America, you could just feel that this band from Melbourne, you could feel them at the top of their game. While I wasn’t impressed by the audience reaction and I am sure DC would have given them a better reaction based on their show in April at the 9:30, the sound quality at HOB was amazing. Afterwards, I ran into half of the band, smiles all around. (Who wouldn’t have been happy with a performance like that?) I would love to see them again, but I think their days of playing clubs are over.

2. the Joy Formidable at Washington’s Black Cat Backstage (Thursday 11th November 2010) – Ritzy Bryan knows how to rock it. I mean, I never expected her to go for it as much as she did when the Joy Formidable played DC for the first time last month. WOW. Talk about unleashing pure, unadulterated power. I’d been having such a hohum month that this gig kicked me in the arse and said, you know what? Music – and how you feel it – is what it’s all about. Cannot wait for ‘The Big Roar’ to come out next year, accompanied by full tours in the US and the UK, of course.

1. the Postelles at Washington’s DC9 (18th September 2010) – The Postelles, four incredibly fun guys from New York City who play the most fun guitar pop ever, haven’t even released a full album yet. Like the Joy Formidable, they had nothing to lose and everything to gain by throwing themselves 1,000x into their performance. And judging from the Saturday night crowd assembled to watch them – and go crazy for them – full scale Postellementalism is just around the corner.

After the jump is a full list of all the gigs I’ve been to in 2010 (in reverse chronological order) so you have an idea how difficult my job was to choose favourites. The runner-up gigs (gigs that fell were in my top 10 but did not make my top 5) are also marked.
Continue reading Top Gigs of 2010: Editor’s Picks

 

MP3 of the Day #249: The Temper Trap

 
By on Wednesday, 13th October 2010 at 10:00 am
 

It never occurred to me that the falsetto voice of the Temper Trap‘s Dougy Mandagi would be suited perfectly to disco music. Never even crossed my mind. Leave it to New Yorker Chris Glover, better known as Penguin Prison, to remix the Aussie band’s ‘Resurrection’ into a song that would work on any dance floor. Gosh.

I would love to hear what the Temper Trap have to say about this.

MP3: The Temper Trap – Resurrection (Penguin Prison remix)

 

Live Review: The Temper Trap with Delphic and the Hundred in the Hands at the House of Blues, Boston – 29th September 2010

 
By on Monday, 4th October 2010 at 2:00 pm
 

You’re probably wondering why I’d bother writing a gig review for the second night on a month-long tour featuring the Temper Trap with Delphic and the Hundred in the Hands as support when I’ve already written up the first night, as the experience at each American venue on this tour is pretty much the same, right? Wrong. I was once asked by a London friend if there was really a difference in accents and personalities in people from Boston compared to those from New York or those from Washington. Without a doubt.

Similarly, you’re going to get a different gig experience depending where you see a band. And venues themselves are different by nature of different clientele, different layouts, different lighting and even different beverage options (though I do not detail the last item on that list in this review, because I was too busy covering the show to drink).

So in this review, I’m going to compare and contrast Sunday’s show in physical and gig attributes at Philadelphia Trocadero with the Wednesday night one in at Boston’s House of Blues.

Physical attributes
1. Size – Trocadero: 1200. House of Blues: 2400. Winner: Trocadero. Definitely the more intimate experience. Would have been better if the stage wasn’t that high though.

2. Layout – Trocadero: floor plus one shallow balcony, bar is upstairs way in the back. House of Blues: floor plus 2 expansive balconies, bars on both sides of the floor. Winner: House of Blues. I don’t want to have to leave my good spot at the front to go on a completely different floor to get my alcohol and stay there, because who knows if I’ll ever be able to get back to my spot. However, if it were my favourite band, I’d just forgo alcohol to stake my spot in the front.

3. History – Trocadero: historic building, used to be a famous burlesque theatre. House of Blues: was built on the smoldering razed remains of two smaller clubs. Winner: Trocadero. Because people’s favourite small venues weren’t destroyed to build it.

4. Sound – Trocadero: muddled in places, which caused problems for the Hundred in the Hands and Delphic, not as noticeable with the Temper Trap. House of Blues: bigger speakers, so overall sound was louder and booming. Winner: House of Blues. You can’t compare a world-class venue with a tiny theatre, except for intimacy.

5. Beauty / ambience – Trocadero: pretty bare bones with some nice old-fashioned moulding. Hot as hell. House of Blues: neon lights and well-lit bars. Nicely air-conditioned. Winner: House of Blues. I could breathe and enjoy a beautiful venue.

Gig attributes
6. Audience – Trocadero: front row standing was stock still for the entire show, disappointing. Second row and beyond behind them, absolutely amazing energy, even for the two opening acts they’d never heard of. House of Blues: a little stiff until close to the end with the Temper Trap. Maybe they were just being respectful and acting like normal Bostonians at a HOB show? Dunno. I heard the previous night with Jason Derulo was mental though. Winner: Trocadero. Mostly for the people who really gave the Hundred in the Hands and Delphic a chance and found out they were great!

7. Sets – Trocadero: a little birdy told me the opening acts did not soundcheck here, so with that information, the Temper Trap deserve a handicap. House of Blues: sets were identical except that Delphic added my favourite song, ‘Submission’, to the mix. Chalk up rustiness from not playing it since Bestival a couple weeks prior but the vocal key for the song seemed off and overall it seemed a wee tentative. But all three bands were definitely more confident in Boston compared to Philadelphia. Winner: House of Blues, by a hair. Because I think the bands had more energy here.

Overall band winner
I have to give it up to the Temper Trap. They look the part and sound great. I talked to guitarist Lorenzo Sillitto after the show and told him I thought they really should be playing arenas with their amazing show and he said that the trick was for them to write and record their second album and use that to tour the arenas. All I can say is, we will be waiting. Impatiently!

Set lists and additional photos are under the cut.

Continue reading Live Review: The Temper Trap with Delphic and the Hundred in the Hands at the House of Blues, Boston – 29th September 2010

 

Live Review: The Temper Trap with Delphic and the Hundred in the Hands at the Trocadero, Philadelphia – 26th September 2010

 
By on Tuesday, 28th September 2010 at 2:00 pm
 

It is indeed something truly special when the stars align and allow the beleaguered blogger to see not just one band, not two, but three that she adores. I got that chance Sunday night at the Trocadero, a historic former burlesque theatre in Philadelphia, with The Temper Trap as the headliner and Delphic and The Hundred in the Hands providing support. Punters that had assembled for the long queue outside the venue before doors knew next to nothing about the opening bands and maybe knew the Temper Trap well or somewhat vaguely. Not a great start. But once inside, I managed a second row vista, perfect with the Trocadero’s far too high stage for such a smallish club. I met some very devoted Temper Trap fans who needed some background on the other two bands, which I was happy to provide.

Regular readers of TGTF already know I think the Hundred in the Hands’ debut album released last week is fantastic. Live, I was pleased with their performance and how they sounded. For most of their set, lead singer / synth player Eleanore Everdell sang into a pod-shaped microphone and was ‘buckled down’ to where her synth was. I reckon she’s got so much rhythm within her, she’d make an amazing dancer onstage (think Friendly Fires). Jason Friedman’s guitar riffs added punch to ‘Last City’, which is rapidly racing up my list of current favourite tracks. I was hopeful that ‘Pigeons’ would get people dancing. Well, there were some people dancing – myself and my new friends in second row. The people in front of us looked bored for pretty much the entire night, exanimate. Kind of frustrating I suppose given that the Hundred in the Hands aren’t exactly mainstream in America yet.

Same goes for Delphic, who in my opinion fared far better in the opening band popularity contest (despite drummer Dan Hadley nearly deafening the early assembled crowd testing his drum kit on ‘Doubt’). A bloke next to me who’d shown up specifically for them showed me a clipping from NME where the band was lying on the floor, looking uncomfortable in leather (you know the one I’m talking about, I bet). Besides myself and him, I think we were the only ones who’d ever knowingly heard a Delphic song before.

I was hoping they’d play ‘Submission’ for personal reasons but when you’re an opener, you have to pick and choose the best from what you’ve got to play, and I think they chose all the right ones to pick up the energy in the crowd. ‘Red Lights’ concluded with an extended synth-laden outro that got the crowd cheering. The sheer magnificence of ‘Counterpoint’, with a steady build-up from the resigned lyrics to the incredible swell of sound at the end, finally got everyone in the club into the music. I remember when I heard ‘Counterpoint’ as a single last year. I knew it was dramatic, but I hadn’t realised just how dramatic until I saw Delphic live this summer at Roskilde, and this was demonstrated even further in Philadelphic. Also, not sure how long he’s been giving it his 110%, but Rick Boardman is really going for those high backing vocal notes with passion. I’m looking forward to their new material and where they go from here.

Continue reading Live Review: The Temper Trap with Delphic and the Hundred in the Hands at the Trocadero, Philadelphia – 26th September 2010

 

Roskilde Festival: Day 4 Roundup

 
By on Thursday, 22nd July 2010 at 2:00 pm
 

Sunday. Day 4 of Roskilde. We’re in the homestretch now. It feels like I’ve been running a marathon for the last 3 days (complete with perspiration) and there is some relief that it will be over. But that is tempered largely by the thought that indeed, the festival will soon be over, which means my return to America. A sad thought.

I decide on a lie-in, a relaxing breakfast (as opposed to the semi-frantic protein bulk-up brekky of the day before), not traipsing over to the festival until mid-afternoon. The first act I see is Korean rhythmic group Dulsori, a swirling dervish of drum and stringed instrument players, both men and women. I feel terrible that they are in their traditional garb; they must be boiling. But the power and effort they use to put on a show seems unaffected by the freakishly hot temperatures. I didn’t think they would go down well with a Danish audience, but their performance concludes with loud cheers at Odeon.

Pavilion is close by to Odeon and quite near to what became my go-to food stall for sheer overall food size. (Slight hilarity that most of the food I ate at Roskilde came from a place called ‘Dixie Burger’ that served Southern-American style hamburgers.) And Pavilion is hosting the highly-touted Californian band Local Natives. Maybe it is because the festival is drawing to a close or I have seen so many great acts already, but I am not impressed by the band from Los Angeles. My ears perk up when I hear the riffs of ‘Flake’, a song by American surfer dude Jack Johnson that came out when I was in uni. I hang out with the tired festival-goers in the shade and watch Johnson from the Orange Stage jumbotrons. He was another act that I thought would get ‘lost in translation’ at Roskilde, but his low-key, ambling guitar pop seems to fit everyone here to a T.

After the cut: this review of day 4 continued with more photos.

Continue reading Roskilde Festival: Day 4 Roundup

 

Preview: T in the Park 2010

 
By on Tuesday, 4th May 2010 at 12:00 pm
 

Even with many acts still to be revealed, the lineup for Scottish festival T in the Park is looking pretty impressive.  From 9th to 11th July, 2010, thousands of punters will descend upon a disused airfield in Balado, Kinross-shire for a weekend of camping, shopping, carnival attractions and music across 7 stages.

Friday night see’s live favourite Muse headline the main stage, which will also be graced by Paloma Faith, Faithless and other artists yet to be announced. Rather disappointingly, the Radio 1/NME Stage will be headlined by American pop group Black Eyed Peas, who are, in this humble blogger’s opinion, an incredibly obnoxious band. They’ll be playing after TGTF favourites Florence and the Machine and The Temper Trap, as well as Jamie T. Another questionable choice is 3Oh!3 in King Tut’s Wah Wah Tent, though they’ll share the stage with great bands like Calvin Harris, Hot Chip, La Roux and Dirty Projectors. And finally, the Red Bull Bedroom Jam Futures Stage will see Echo and the Bunnymen and TGTF favourite Delphic on Friday.

It’s a toss-up between Saturday and Sunday for which day has the best lineup this year. Rapper Eminem will make his debut T in the Park appearance as Saturday’s Main Stage headliner, marking his first festival performance since 2001. The Main Stage will also see performances by Paolo Nutini, Stereophonics, Vampire Weekend and the Proclaimers. The Radio 1/NME Stage is pretty amazing on Saturday night, with a lineup including The Prodigy, The Courteeners and Wolfmother, and King Tut’s Wah Wah Tent is looking equally fantastic. It’ll see the likes of Mumford and Sons, Rodrigo y Gabriela, We Are Scientists and Kate Nash. Other notable artists like Julian Casablancas, Laura Marling and the Middle East will be gracing the Red Bull Bedroom Jam Futures Stage on Saturday.

Rockers Kasabian headline the Main Stage on Sunday, playing along with other massively popular artists like Jay-Z, Biffy Clyro, John Mayer and Dizzee Rascal. The Radio 1/NME Stage is looking good, too, with performances by Groove Armada, the Cribs, Babyshambles and Rise Against throughout the day. Some of the best up-and-coming bands of the festivals can be seen Sunday on the Red Bull Bedroom Jam Futures Stage, including Bombay Bicycle Club, the Drums, Yeasayer and Two Door Cinema Club.

The festival sold out within 90 minutes,  so if you don’t already have tickets, I’m afraid you’re out of luck. Let us know what you think of the lineup!

Full lineup after the jump…

Continue reading Preview: T in the Park 2010

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us

Privacy Policy

Keep TGTF online for years to come!
Donate here.